Large-Scale Ceramic Composite Structures via Near-Net-Shape Processing of Carbon Preforms

  1. Prof. Dr. G. Müller
  1. C. Müller,
  2. S. Walter,
  3. U. Papenburg and
  4. W. Pfrang

Published Online: 27 APR 2006

DOI: 10.1002/3527607293.ch45

Ceramics - Processing, Reliability, Tribology and Wear, Volume 12

Ceramics - Processing, Reliability, Tribology and Wear, Volume 12

How to Cite

Müller, C., Walter, S., Papenburg, U. and Pfrang, W. (2000) Large-Scale Ceramic Composite Structures via Near-Net-Shape Processing of Carbon Preforms, in Ceramics - Processing, Reliability, Tribology and Wear, Volume 12 (ed G. Müller), Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim, FRG. doi: 10.1002/3527607293.ch45

Editor Information

  1. Fraunhofer-Institut für Silicatforschung, Neunerplatz 2, 97082 Würzburg, Germany

Author Information

  1. Industrieanlagen-Betriebsgesellschaft mbH (IABG), Einsteinstr. 20, D-85521 Ottobrunn, Germany

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 27 APR 2006
  2. Published Print: 27 JUN 2000

Book Series:

  1. EUROMAT 99

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9783527301942

Online ISBN: 9783527607297

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Keywords:

  • large-scale ceramic composite structures;
  • near-net-shape processing of carbon preforms

Summary

Processing of ceramic matrix composites (CMC) presented in this article is based on the conversion of porous carbon preforms into C/SiC-ceramics by reaction infiltration of liquid silicon. For the processing itself as well as for the materials properties of the derived composites, microstructure and architecture of the used preforms play a key role.

Composites are fabricated by starting from chopped, carbon short fiber reinforced carbons (C/C) which are machined by conventional CNC milling. Accordingly, very complex component geometries can be shaped. After subsequent reaction infiltration by a silicon melt, silicon carbide (SiC) is formed. In the as-processed composites, remnants of unreacted carbon as well as excess silicon are also present. The infiltration process is accompanied by no significant volume change. This near-net-shape feature allows to fabricate comparatively large components. At the same time also very thin-walled, light-weight structures can be processed. Furthermore, the near-net-shape character of the process allows a joining technique to be applied for the fabrication of multi-segmented components.

This contribution presents C/SiC composites for specific applications that are derived from different types of carbon/carbon starting materials. Examples include large-dimensioned optical light-weight structures, large retorts for processing of metals and tube components to be used in combustion technology.