Chapter 9. Listeria monocytogenes: A Model System for Studying Autophagy

  1. Prof. Dr. Vojo Deretic
  1. Kathryn A. Rich and
  2. Paul Webster

Published Online: 28 AUG 2006

DOI: 10.1002/352760880X.ch9

Autophagy in Immunity and Infection: A Novel Immune Effector

Autophagy in Immunity and Infection: A Novel Immune Effector

How to Cite

Rich, K. A. and Webster, P. (2006) Listeria monocytogenes: A Model System for Studying Autophagy, in Autophagy in Immunity and Infection: A Novel Immune Effector (ed V. Deretic), Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim, FRG. doi: 10.1002/352760880X.ch9

Editor Information

  1. Departments of Molecular Genetics & Microbiology and Cell Biology & Physiology, University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center, 915 Camino de Salud, NE, Albuquerque, NM 87131-001, USA

Author Information

  1. House Ear Institute, 2100 W Third Street, Los Angeles, CA 90057, USA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 28 AUG 2006
  2. Published Print: 20 JUN 2006

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9783527314508

Online ISBN: 9783527608805

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Keywords:

  • autophagy;
  • immunity;
  • infection;
  • Listeria monocytogenes;
  • listeriosis;
  • invasion of mammalian cells;
  • assembly of Avs;
  • fusion of cytoplasmic membrane structures;
  • pathogenic cytoplasmic bacteria;
  • avoid atophagic pathway

Summary

This chapter contains sections titled:

  • Listeriosis

  • Invasion of Mammalian Cells by L. monocytogenes

  • Autophagy

  • The Ideal Target for Studying the Early Stages of Autophagy

  • Why Other Organisms may not be as Useful to Study the Autophagic Process

  • Assembly of AVs may Result from Fusion of Cytoplasmic Membrane Structures

  • Pathogenic Cytoplasmic Bacteria can avoid the Autophagic Pathway

  • Cellular Fate of Metabolically Inhibited L. monocytogenes

  • References