Chapter 17. The Role of Stress in the Etiology of Medically Unexplained Syndromes

  1. Prof. Dr. Bengt B. Arnetz3,4 and
  2. Prof. Rolf Ekman5
  1. James Rubin1 and
  2. Simon Wessely2

Published Online: 21 AUG 2006

DOI: 10.1002/3527609156.ch17

Stress in Health and Disease

Stress in Health and Disease

How to Cite

Rubin, J. and Wessely, S. (2006) The Role of Stress in the Etiology of Medically Unexplained Syndromes, in Stress in Health and Disease (eds B. B. Arnetz and R. Ekman), Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim, FRG. doi: 10.1002/3527609156.ch17

Editor Information

  1. 3

    Division of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Wayne State University, 101 E. Alexandrine, Detroit, Michigan 48201-2011, USA

  2. 4

    Division of Social Medicine, Uppsala University, Uppsala Science Park, Social Medicine, 75185 Uppsala, Sweden

  3. 5

    Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Neurochemical laboratory, Mölndal/SU, 43180 Mölndal, Sweden

Author Information

  1. 1

    Mobile Phones Research Unit, New Medical School Building, Bessemer Road, London SE5 9PJ, UK

  2. 2

    Psychological Medicine Division, King's College London, Strand, London WC2R 2LS, UK

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 21 AUG 2006
  2. Published Print: 20 JUL 2006

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9783527312214

Online ISBN: 9783527609154

SEARCH

Keywords:

  • stress in health and disease;
  • stress and the individual;
  • role of stress in etiology;
  • medically unexplained syndromes;
  • association with psychosocial stress;
  • possible mechanisms;
  • implications for diagnosis;
  • implications for treatment

Summary

This chapter contains sections titled:

  • Medically Unexplained Syndromes

  • Evidence for an Association with Psychosocial Stress

    • Life Events as Risk Factors for Illness Onset

    • Occupational Stress and “Technostress” as Risk Factors for Illness Onset

    • Stress as an Exacerbating Factor in Medically Unexplained Illnesses

  • Possible Mechanisms

    • Negative Mood as a Mediating Variable

    • Symptom Amplification

    • Classical Conditioning

    • Chronic Neuroendocrine Dysfunction

    • Cardiovascular and Neuroendocrine Responses to Acute Stressors

  • Implications for Diagnosis

  • Implications for Treatment

  • References