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Mitochondrial Genome: Evolution

  1. Mark Stoneking

Published Online: 15 APR 2013

DOI: 10.1002/9780470015902.a0005074.pub3

eLS

eLS

How to Cite

Stoneking, M. 2013. Mitochondrial Genome: Evolution. eLS. .

Author Information

  1. Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Leipzig, Germany

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 15 APR 2013

Abstract

Mitochondria, organelles that are responsible for producing energy for cell metabolism and also involved in cell death and ageing, contain their own genome. This genome has several unusual properties including a high copy number, a maternal and haploid mode of inheritance and a rapid rate of evolution. Recent advances in next-generation sequencing methods have made it feasible to obtain complete mitochondrial deoxyribonucleic acid (mtDNA) genome sequences quickly and at low-cost, providing new insights into human mtDNA variation and evolution. These methods also enable much more detailed studies of heteroplasmy across the entire mtDNA genome, which may be important in mtDNA-associated diseases and cancer. It is also feasible to obtain complete mtDNA genome sequences from Neanderthals and other archaic humans, thereby providing further insights into human evolution.

Key Concepts:

  • Mitochondria have their own genome, which has a separate origin from the nuclear genome.

  • The mitochondrial genome has several unusual properties compared with the nuclear genome, including high copy number, maternal and haploid mode of inheritance and a rapid rate of evolution.

  • Next-generation sequencing and other technical advances make it feasible to obtain complete mtDNA genome sequences rapidly and at low cost from large samples of individuals and are providing new insights into mtDNA variation and heteroplasmy.

  • MtDNA analyses support the hypothesis of a recent African origin of modern humans.

  • Archaic humans, such as Neandertals and Denisovans, did not contribute mtDNA to modern humans.

Keywords:

  • mitochondrial DNA;
  • evolution;
  • human mtDNA variation;
  • human origins;
  • heteroplasmy;
  • rate of mtDNA evolution;
  • archaic humans;
  • maternal inheritance