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Evolutionarily Conserved Intronic Splicing Regulatory Elements in the Human Genome

  1. Eric L Van Nostrand1,
  2. Gene W Yeo2

Published Online: 15 JUL 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470015902.a0021005

eLS

eLS

How to Cite

Van Nostrand, E. L. and Yeo, G. W. 2008. Evolutionarily Conserved Intronic Splicing Regulatory Elements in the Human Genome. eLS. .

Author Information

  1. 1

    Stanford University, Stanford, California, USA

  2. 2

    Salk Institute, La Jolla, California, USA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 15 JUL 2008

Abstract

Splicing is the process by which introns are removed from premature messenger ribonucleic acid (pre-mRNA), and exons are ligated to form mature mRNA before translation into protein products. Aside from the consensus splice signals such as the branch point, acceptor and donor splice sites, additional cis-regulatory elements embedded within the exons and introns control the recognition of exonic (approximately 150 bases) from intronic sequence (approximately 100–100 000 bases). Intronic splicing elements that are evolutionarily conserved across multiple species play important roles in the regulation of constitutive splicing, where a single mRNA is produced, and alternative splicing, where multiple mRNA isoforms are generated.

Keywords:

  • alternative splicing;
  • intronic splicing regulatory elements;
  • evolution;
  • bioinformatics;
  • comparative genomics