Standard Article

Automated Protein Production Technologies

  1. Raymond J Owens,
  2. Jonathan Diprose

Published Online: 15 MAR 2011

DOI: 10.1002/9780470015902.a0023168

eLS

eLS

How to Cite

Owens, R. J. and Diprose, J. 2011. Automated Protein Production Technologies. eLS. .

Author Information

  1. University of Oxford, OPPF-UK, Oxford, UK

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 15 MAR 2011

Abstract

The automation of recombinant protein production enables the rapid and parallel processing of multiple products. Laboratory robotic systems have been developed that deliver a range of automated protein production technologies, including expression screening in both cell-based and cell-free systems. Liquid handling robotics are routinely used in the small-scale purification of proteins in parallel based on affinity capture methods typically on metal chelating matrices. Multidimensional chromatography has also been automated enabling complex protein purification strategies to be carried out with little manual intervention. The increasing use of cell-based assays in discovery projects has driven the development of dedicated robotic systems for handling the culture of mammalian cells. Critical to the successful implementation of laboratory automation is the development of an information management system to ensure the recording of data and tracking of samples generated during the process of protein production.

Key Concepts:

  • The automation of recombinant protein production enables the rapid and parallel processing of multiple products.

  • Automation can be beneficial in both cost and reproducibility.

  • The automation of liquid handling tasks involving either cells, nucleic acids or protein samples is central to all laboratory robotic systems.

  • Using modular robotics enables workflow changes to be introduced without the need to rebuild a complete system.

  • Managing the increased volume of data arising from automation can be a problem in its own right.

  • The biggest benefits come from integrating automated systems with electronic Laboratory Information Management Systems.

  • Analysis of the large datasets collected can lead to tools that predict how an untested protein will behave.

Keywords:

  • automation;
  • protein production;
  • laboratory information management