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Thermal Evolution Methods for Carbon, Sulfur, Oxygen, Nitrogen and Hydrogen in Iron and Steel Analysis

Steel and Related Materials

  1. Dennis A. Lawrenz,
  2. Joel Mitchell

Published Online: 15 SEP 2006

DOI: 10.1002/9780470027318.a2414

Encyclopedia of Analytical Chemistry

Encyclopedia of Analytical Chemistry

How to Cite

Lawrenz, D. A. and Mitchell, J. 2006. Thermal Evolution Methods for Carbon, Sulfur, Oxygen, Nitrogen and Hydrogen in Iron and Steel Analysis. Encyclopedia of Analytical Chemistry. .

Author Information

  1. LECO® Corporation, St. Joseph, USA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 15 SEP 2006

Abstract

A thermal evolution method is a method of destructive analysis in which the sample is subjected to heating, combustion, or fusion1 to quantify the chemical composition of iron and steel. Thermal evolution methods have been used for many years to determine carbon, sulfur, oxygen, nitrogen, and hydrogen contents of iron and steel. Carbon and sulfur are determined using combustion techniques. Oxygen and nitrogen are determined using inert gas fusion techniques. Hydrogen is determined using either inert gas fusion or hot extraction techniques. Analytical instrumentation for all of these techniques is commercially available.