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Electrochemical Detection Methods Following Liquid Chromatography, Capillary Electrophoresis, and Microchip Electrophoresis Separations

Electroanalytical Methods

  1. Matthew K. Hulvey1,
  2. Susan M. Lunte1,
  3. David J. Fischer2,
  4. Courtney D. Kuhnline2

Published Online: 15 DEC 2010

DOI: 10.1002/9780470027318.a9071

Encyclopedia of Analytical Chemistry

Encyclopedia of Analytical Chemistry

How to Cite

Hulvey, M. K., Lunte, S. M., Fischer, D. J. and Kuhnline, C. D. 2010. Electrochemical Detection Methods Following Liquid Chromatography, Capillary Electrophoresis, and Microchip Electrophoresis Separations. Encyclopedia of Analytical Chemistry. .

Author Information

  1. 1

    University of Kansas, Ralph N. Adams Institute for Bioanalytical Chemistry, Department of Chemistry, Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, Lawrence, KS, USA

  2. 2

    University of Kansas, Ralph N. Adams Institute for Bioanalytical Chemistry, Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, Lawrence, KS, USA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 15 DEC 2010

Abstract

Electrochemical detection has proved to be an invaluable tool for analytical applications in a variety of research areas including environmental analysis, materials research, bioanalysis, and neuroscience. While some electrochemical techniques function as stand-alone methods, a few techniques, including amperometry, conductivity, and voltammetry, have been found to be useful as detectors for separation-based methods. Electrochemistry (EC) has the ability to provide chemical reduction/oxidation (redox) information about the analytes of interest and can be utilized for direct, quantitative analysis if the number of electrons in the redox process is known. Additional advantages of electrochemical detection include low detection limits, high selectivity, portability, low cost, and the ability to miniaturize the system without a loss in sensitivity. This article focuses on the principles and applications of EC detection in liquid chromatography (LC), capillary electrophoresis (CE), and microchip electrophoresis (ME) systems. Topics include an overview of electrochemical detection schemes and electrode materials, a brief introduction to LC, CE, and ME, and discussions of applications of the above-mentioned detection schemes to these separation methods.

Keywords:

  • capillary electrophoresis;
  • microchip electrophoresis;
  • liquid chromatography;
  • electrochemistry;
  • amperometric detection;
  • voltammetric detection;
  • conductivity detection;
  • flow cell;
  • isolated potentiostat