15. The Role of Nickel in Environmental Adaptation of the Gastric Pathogen Helicobacter pylori

  1. Astrid Sigel5,
  2. Helmut Sigel5 and
  3. Roland K. O. Sigel6
  1. Florian D. Ernst1,
  2. Arnoud H. M. van Vliet1,
  3. Manfred Kist2,
  4. Johannes G. Kusters3 and
  5. Stefan Bereswill4

Published Online: 9 MAR 2007

DOI: 10.1002/9780470028131.ch15

Nickel and Its Surprising Impact in Nature, Volume 2

Nickel and Its Surprising Impact in Nature, Volume 2

How to Cite

Ernst, F. D., van Vliet, A. H. M., Kist, M., Kusters, J. G. and Bereswill, S. (2007) The Role of Nickel in Environmental Adaptation of the Gastric Pathogen Helicobacter pylori, in Nickel and Its Surprising Impact in Nature, Volume 2 (eds A. Sigel, H. Sigel and R. K. O. Sigel), John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, Chichester, UK. doi: 10.1002/9780470028131.ch15

Editor Information

  1. 5

    Department of Chemistry, Inorganic Chemistry, University of Basel, Spitalstrasse 51, CH-4056 Basel, Switzerland

  2. 6

    Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, University of Zürich, Room 34-F-36, Winterthurerstrasse 190, CH-8057 Zürich, Switzerland

Author Information

  1. 1

    Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Erasmus MC - University Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands

  2. 2

    Department of Microbiology and Hygiene, Institute of Medical Microbiology and Hygiene, University Hospital, Freiburg, Germany

  3. 3

    Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Erasmus MC-University Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands

  4. 4

    Charité - University Medicine Berlin, Institute for Microbiology and Hygiene, Campus Charité Mitte, Dorotheenstrasse 96, D-10117 Berlin, Germany

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 9 MAR 2007
  2. Published Print: 26 JAN 2007

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470016718

Online ISBN: 9780470028131

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Keywords:

  • urease;
  • Helicobacter pylori;
  • Ni/Fe-hydrogenase;
  • gene regulation;
  • gastric adaption;
  • nickel metabolism;
  • therapeutics

Summary

Diseases of the upper intestinal tract represent a common problem that nearly everybody encounters during life. Before the discovery of the gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori, such disorders remained debilitating and incurable in many cases. The first report on spiral bacteria in the stomach of non-human mammals dates back over 100 years. However, scientific proof for bacteria as causes for gastric diseases did not come until 1982, when Robin Warren and Barry Marshall, together with the local microbiologists, isolated H. pylori from gastric biopsy samples. Marshall fulfilled Koch's postulates for H. pylori in a self-infection experiment. The identification of H. pylori infection as causative agent of gastric and duodenal disorders was a major breakthrough in gastroenterology, for which Marshall and Warren were awarded the Nobel Prize in medicine in 2005. This discovery offered not only a novel idea for the understanding of mechanisms underlying gastritis, ulcerations, lymphomas, and gastric cancer, but also for the treatment of gastric diseases by antimicrobial therapy. In this review, we focus on the essential role of H. pylori nickel ion metabolism and metal ion homeostasis in gastric adaptation and highlight the extraordinary role of nickel in acid resistance required for both primary colonization and long-term survival in the hostile gastric niche. As H. pylori uses nickel-cofactored enzymes as first-line defense, the nickel metabolism represents a potential drug target. Therefore, we discuss three possible new lines of treatment: vaccination, inhibition of enzymes of the H. pylori metal metabolism, and a metal diet.