Cross-Talk between Growth Factor and Purinergic Signalling Regulates Schwann Cell Proliferation

  1. Derek J. Chadwick Organizer and
  2. Jamie Goode
  1. Beth Stevens1,2

Published Online: 7 OCT 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470032244.ch13

Purinergic Signalling in Neuron-Glia Interactions: Novartis Foundation Symposium 276

Purinergic Signalling in Neuron-Glia Interactions: Novartis Foundation Symposium 276

How to Cite

Stevens, B. (2008) Cross-Talk between Growth Factor and Purinergic Signalling Regulates Schwann Cell Proliferation, in Purinergic Signalling in Neuron-Glia Interactions: Novartis Foundation Symposium 276 (eds D. J. Chadwick and J. Goode), John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, Chichester, UK. doi: 10.1002/9780470032244.ch13

Author Information

  1. 1

    Stanford University, Department of Neurobiology, 299 Campus Drive, Fairchild Building D200, Stanford, CA 94305-5125, USA

  2. 2

    Nervous System Development and Plasticity Section, National Institutes of Health, NICHD, 35 Lincoln Drive, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 7 OCT 2008
  2. Published Print: 21 APR 2006

Book Series:

  1. Novartis Foundation Symposia

Book Series Editors:

  1. Novartis Foundation

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470018606

Online ISBN: 9780470032244

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Keywords:

  • multiple mitogenic signals and Schwann cells (SCs);
  • adenosine and GF interactions in SC proliferation;
  • neuron–SC communication;
  • cross-talk between growth factors;
  • fine-tuning MAPK signalling in SCs

Summary

Axons provide multiple mitogenic signals to Schwann cells (SCs), yet at an appropriate stage of development, SCs stop dividing despite the mitogenic action of axolemma and growth factors. This implies that the effect of mitogens on cell proliferation may be context-dependent, having different effects on cell proliferation depending upon other signals in the extracellular environment. Recent research has shown that the effects of adenosine on SC proliferation depend upon the growth factor environment, and that the extracellular signal-regulated kinase/mitogen-activated protein kinase (ERK/ MAPK) signalling pathway is an important point of integration between purinergic and growth factor signalling. In the absence of growth factors, adenosine is mitogenic and associated with stimulation of the ERK/MAPK pathway in SCs. However, in the presence of growth factors (platelet-derived growth factor or neuregulin), adenosine has the opposite effect, inhibiting proliferation and ERK/MAPK activation. Together these findings suggest a mechanism by which increased neural impulse activity could modulate growth factor signalling to both positively and negatively regulate SC proliferation before the onset of myelination.