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Robotic Tactile Sensors

  1. Masahiro Ohka

Published Online: 16 MAR 2009

DOI: 10.1002/9780470050118.ecse672

Wiley Encyclopedia of Computer Science and Engineering

Wiley Encyclopedia of Computer Science and Engineering

How to Cite

Ohka, M. 2009. Robotic Tactile Sensors. Wiley Encyclopedia of Computer Science and Engineering. 2453–2461.

Author Information

  1. Nagoya University, Nagoya, Japan

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 16 MAR 2009

Abstract

In robotics, tactile sensation is also important to perform manipulation, especially in recent robotic research related to cooperative work between robots and human beings, where tactile sensation is required to prevent accidental contact. So far, various tactile sensors have been developed based on several physical phenomena, such as the piezoelectric effect, the resistance variation of conductive rubber, magnetic variation, and the optical effect. Since every tactile sensor has both merits and demerits, realizing tactile sensors for general use would have remained very difficult. In the last decade, advanced tactile sensors for limited use have appeared gradually, such as new MEMS-based tactile sensors, PVDF tactile sensors, a stick-slip tactile sensor, a human mimetic tactile sensor, a wireless tactile sensor, an advanced conductive rubber type tactile sensor, and image data-based tactile sensors. As work on these tactile sensors advances, future combined designs will probably compensate for their current respective demerits. Cooperative interaction between robots and human beings will be a common situation. Since tactile sensation is required to prevent accidental contact between them in humanoid robotics, the importance of tactile sensors will continue to increase.

Keywords:

  • tactile sensor;
  • MEMS;
  • PVDF;
  • conductive rubber;
  • image based;
  • three-axis