Chapter 1. The Relationship Between Genotype and Phenotype: Some Basic Concepts

  1. Patrizia Ferretti1,
  2. Andrew Copp1,
  3. Cheryll Tickle2 and
  4. Gudrun Moore3
  1. Philip Stanier1 and
  2. Gudrun Moore3

Published Online: 25 JAN 2010

DOI: 10.1002/9780470090121.ch1

Embryos, Genes and Birth Defects, Second Edition

Embryos, Genes and Birth Defects, Second Edition

How to Cite

Stanier, P. and Moore, G. (2008) The Relationship Between Genotype and Phenotype: Some Basic Concepts, in Embryos, Genes and Birth Defects, Second Edition (eds P. Ferretti, A. Copp, C. Tickle and G. Moore), John Wiley & Sons Ltd, Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9780470090121.ch1

Editor Information

  1. 1

    Neural Development Unit/Developmental Biology Unit, UCL Institute of Child Health, 30 Guilford Street, London WC1N 1EH, UK

  2. 2

    Division of Cell and Developmental Biology, School of Life Sciences, MSI/WTB Complex, University of Dundee, Dow Street, Dundee, UK

  3. 3

    Clinical and Molecular Genetics, UCL Institute of Child Health, 30 Guilford Street, London WC1N 1EH, UK

Author Information

  1. 1

    Neural Development Unit/Developmental Biology Unit, UCL Institute of Child Health, 30 Guilford Street, London WC1N 1EH, UK

  2. 3

    Clinical and Molecular Genetics, UCL Institute of Child Health, 30 Guilford Street, London WC1N 1EH, UK

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 25 JAN 2010
  2. Published Print: 21 NOV 2008

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470090107

Online ISBN: 9780470090121

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Keywords:

  • genotype and phenotype relationship concepts;
  • birth defects - impact on national health care budgets;
  • genotype, genetic make-up of individual organism;
  • gene mapping - identification of chromosomal location of individual gene;
  • regulatory genes and gene encoding proteins;
  • transcription factors - proteins controlling transcriptional activity of gene;
  • phenotype - effects of genetic and environmental influences;
  • transgenic technology and sophisticated of strategies;
  • human fetal tissues in biomedical research;
  • homeobox-containing genes

Summary

This chapter contains sections titled:

  • Introduction

  • The relationship between genotype and phenotype

  • The role of ‘model’ systems

  • The changing concept of homology

  • References