Chapter 6. Chemical Teratogens: Hazards, Tools and Clues

  1. Patrizia Ferretti2,
  2. Andrew Copp2,
  3. Cheryll Tickle3 and
  4. Gudrun Moore4
  1. Nigel A. Brown

Published Online: 25 JAN 2010

DOI: 10.1002/9780470090121.ch6

Embryos, Genes and Birth Defects, Second Edition

Embryos, Genes and Birth Defects, Second Edition

How to Cite

Brown, N. A. (2008) Chemical Teratogens: Hazards, Tools and Clues, in Embryos, Genes and Birth Defects, Second Edition (eds P. Ferretti, A. Copp, C. Tickle and G. Moore), John Wiley & Sons Ltd, Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9780470090121.ch6

Editor Information

  1. 2

    Neural Development Unit/Developmental Biology Unit, UCL Institute of Child Health, 30 Guilford Street, London WC1N 1EH, UK

  2. 3

    Division of Cell and Developmental Biology, School of Life Sciences, MSI/WTB Complex, University of Dundee, Dow Street, Dundee, UK

  3. 4

    Clinical and Molecular Genetics, UCL Institute of Child Health, 30 Guilford Street, London WC1N 1EH, UK

Author Information

  1. Division of Basic Medical Sciences, St. George's Hospital, University of London, London, UK

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 25 JAN 2010
  2. Published Print: 21 NOV 2008

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470090107

Online ISBN: 9780470090121

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Keywords:

  • chemical teratogens - hazards, tools and clues;
  • teratology - study of birth defects;
  • initial dysmorphogenesis - involving neural suture and presomitic mesoderm;
  • gene-teratogen interaction;
  • ventricular septal defect (VSD);
  • anticonvulsant trimethadione (TMD);
  • antisense oligonucleotides - alternative to complete knock-outs in gene function;
  • programmed cell death, mechanism of morphogenesis;
  • diethylstilboestrol (DES) - preventing threatened miscarriage and complications of pregnancy;
  • α-fetoprotein (AFP) - high affinity for oestradiol

Summary

This chapter contains sections titled:

  • Introduction

  • Teratogens and human malformations

  • General strategy in chemical teratogenesis

  • Valproic acid

  • Gene–teratogen interaction

  • Teratogens and phenocopies

  • Teratogens as manipulative tools

  • Teratogens as clues

  • Final comments

  • References