10. Algorithmic Game Theory and Applications

  1. Amiya Nayak B.Math., Ph.D. Adjunct Research Professor Associate Editor Full Professor3 and
  2. Ivan Stojmenović Ph.D. Chair Professor founder editor-in-chief3,4
  1. Marios Mavronicolas1,
  2. Vicky Papadopoulou1 and
  3. Paul Spirakis2

Published Online: 1 MAR 2007

DOI: 10.1002/9780470175668.ch10

Handbook of Applied Algorithms: Solving Scientific, Engineering and Practical Problems

Handbook of Applied Algorithms: Solving Scientific, Engineering and Practical Problems

How to Cite

Mavronicolas, M., Papadopoulou, V. and Spirakis, P. (2007) Algorithmic Game Theory and Applications, in Handbook of Applied Algorithms: Solving Scientific, Engineering and Practical Problems (eds A. Nayak and I. Stojmenović), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470175668.ch10

Editor Information

  1. 3

    SITE, University of Ottawa, 800 King Edward Ave., Ottawa, ON K1N 6N5, Canada

  2. 4

    EECE, University of Birmingham, UK

Author Information

  1. 1

    Department of Computer Science, University of Cyprus, Nicosia CY-1678, Cyprus

  2. 2

    University of Patras, School of Engineering, GR265 00, Patras, Greece

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 1 MAR 2007
  2. Published Print: 14 FEB 2008

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470044926

Online ISBN: 9780470175668

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Keywords:

  • algorithmic game theory and applications;
  • selfish routing with incomplete information;
  • algorithmic mechanism design

Summary

Methods from game theory and mechanism design have been proven to be a powerful mathematical tool in order to understand, control, and efficiently design dynamic, complex networks, such as the Internet. Game theory provides a good starting point for computer scientists to understand selfish rational behavior of complex networks with many agents. Such a scenario is readily modeled using game theory techniques, in which players with potentially different goals participate under a common setting with well prescribed interactions. The Nash equilibrium stands out as the predominant concept of rationality in noncooperative settings. Thus, game theory and its notions of equilibria provide a rich framework for modeling the behavior of selfish agents in these kinds of distributed and networked environments and offering mechanisms to achieve efficient and desirable global outcomes despite selfish behavior. The most important algorithmic solutions and advances achieved through game theory are reviewed.