Chapter 5. Energy Conservation through Industrial Process Efficiency Improvement

  1. William J. Smothers
  1. Douglas G. Harvey and
  2. Alan J. Streb

Published Online: 28 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470291054.ch5

Proceedings of the American Ceramic Society Conference on Energy Management: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 1, Issue 11/12

Proceedings of the American Ceramic Society Conference on Energy Management: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 1, Issue 11/12

How to Cite

Harvey, D. G. and Streb, A. J. (1980) Energy Conservation through Industrial Process Efficiency Improvement, in Proceedings of the American Ceramic Society Conference on Energy Management: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 1, Issue 11/12 (ed W. J. Smothers), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470291054.ch5

Author Information

  1. Office of Conservation and Solar Energy, U. S. DOE 20 Massachusetts Ave., N. W., Washington, D. C. 20585

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 28 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1980

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470373866

Online ISBN: 9780470291054

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Keywords:

  • mechanisms;
  • spectrum;
  • temperatures;
  • combustion;
  • plenum

Summary

The industrial sector accounted for 37% of the 78 EJ (74 quads) of energy consumed in the U. S. during 1976. Industry relies heavily on oil and natural gas, the two energy sources in shortest supply. These fuels now account for 55% of the energy used by industry. Much of the nation's industrial complex was built when fuel was cheap. As a result, many industrial processes use energy inefficiently, from as low as 10% efficiency in some direct heating processes to about 30% for the most efficient new steelmaklng plants. Energy savings of 30-50% are possible through widespread application of emerging and advancing technologies. The U. S. Department of Energy through the Office of Industrial Programs has undertaken the task of assisting industry in developing more efficient industrial processes directed toward energy conservation. This paper explains the mechanisms used by the Office of Industrial Programs to provide industrial assistance and describes several of the efforts undertaken to date that are related to high-temperature industries and the energy savings presently being realized.