Chapter 20. Mechanisms of Toughening in Ceramic Matrix Composites

  1. William J. Smothers
  1. R. W. Rice

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470291092.ch20

Proceedings of the 5th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 2, Issue 7/8

Proceedings of the 5th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 2, Issue 7/8

How to Cite

Rice, R. W. (1981) Mechanisms of Toughening in Ceramic Matrix Composites, in Proceedings of the 5th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 2, Issue 7/8 (ed W. J. Smothers), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470291092.ch20

Author Information

  1. Naval Research Lab Washington, D.C. 20375

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1981

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470373903

Online ISBN: 9780470291092

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Keywords:

  • composites;
  • mechanisms;
  • ceramics;
  • catastrophic;
  • propagation

Summary

Mechanisms of toughening of ceramic composites are reviewed from several perspectives, with the overall goal of providing guidance in composite development. Some theoretical concepts are used but are not the focus of the paper. The first perspective is an evaluation of why previous ceramic composites approaches were not particularly successful. Mechanisms of composites that are or may be useful are reviewed, followed by a discussion of how these mechanisms can be combined. Finally, cautions based on possible limitations, especially fatigue-type effects, in some composites are noted, along with the need for more thorough characterization. The central theme is that ceramic composites offer an important and challenging opportunity. Further, both particulate and fiber composites and combinations of these are important. All appear best when the dispersed phase is fine in size or diameter, closely spaced (i.e. a high numerical density), and preferably geometrically ordered in the body.