Chapter 6. Synthesis of Ceramic Powders by Laser-Driven Reactions

  1. William J. Smothers
  1. S. C. Danforth and
  2. J. S. Haggerty

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470291092.ch6

Proceedings of the 5th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 2, Issue 7/8

Proceedings of the 5th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 2, Issue 7/8

How to Cite

Danforth, S. C. and Haggerty, J. S. (1981) Synthesis of Ceramic Powders by Laser-Driven Reactions, in Proceedings of the 5th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 2, Issue 7/8 (ed W. J. Smothers), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470291092.ch6

Author Information

  1. Energy Laboratory and Dept. of Materials Science Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Mass. 02139

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1981

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470373903

Online ISBN: 9780470291092

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Keywords:

  • microstructure;
  • temperature;
  • ceramics;
  • heterogeneous;
  • parabolic

Summary

Gas-phase reactions were initiated by laser energy sources in a manner that caused homogeneous nucleation and growth. Resulting Si, Si3, N4, and SiC powders have ideal characteristics for consolidation into dense ceramic pieces. The particles are small, uniform in size, round, pure, and appear loosely agglomerated. Silicon powders were sintered to controlled densities without using sintering aids and then nitrided to completion. Sintering and nitriding kinetics were both rapid because of the small Si particle size. The nitrided microstructure retained the fine features of the green Si. There is some evidence that the Si3N4 powders densified locally without the use of sintering aids.