Chapter 7. Nuclear Wastes-A Problem Requiring Innovations in Processing and Characterization of Advanced Materials

  1. William J. Smothers
  1. Christopher Maurer,
  2. Ladawan Urwongse and
  3. David Clark

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470291092.ch7

Proceedings of the 5th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 2, Issue 7/8

Proceedings of the 5th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 2, Issue 7/8

How to Cite

Maurer, C., Urwongse, L. and Clark, D. (1981) Nuclear Wastes-A Problem Requiring Innovations in Processing and Characterization of Advanced Materials, in Proceedings of the 5th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 2, Issue 7/8 (ed W. J. Smothers), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470291092.ch7

Author Information

  1. Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Florida Gainesville, Fla. 326111

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1981

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470373903

Online ISBN: 9780470291092

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Keywords:

  • encapsulation;
  • radioactive;
  • geological;
  • materials;
  • platinum

Summary

A major problem facing the nuclear industry is the safe disposal of radioactive waste from both commercial power plants and defense facilities. Presently, the most promising method involves the encapsulation of radioactive species within a host material and then burying the entire system in a stable geological repository. Several potential candidate ceramics show promise as host materials. The long-term (> 10 000 years) high performance demanded from these materials requires innovations in their development, processing, and characterization. Major emphasis in this paper is on glass and its resistance to corrosion.