11. Metal Marking of Dinnerware Glaze: Correlation with Friction and Surface Roughness

  1. William M. Carty
  1. Hyojin Lee,
  2. William M. Carty and
  3. Robert J. Castilone

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470291177.ch11

Whitewares and Materials: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 25, Issue 2

Whitewares and Materials: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 25, Issue 2

How to Cite

Lee, H., Carty, W. M. and Castilone, R. J. (2004) Metal Marking of Dinnerware Glaze: Correlation with Friction and Surface Roughness, in Whitewares and Materials: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 25, Issue 2 (ed W. M. Carty), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470291177.ch11

Author Information

  1. Whiteware Research Center, New York State College of Ceramics at Alfred University. Alfred, New York

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 2004

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470051474

Online ISBN: 9780470291177

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Keywords:

  • surface roughness;
  • dinnerware glaze;
  • crystallization;
  • clear gloss glazes;
  • zircon crystallization

Summary

Although metal marking behavior of dinnerware glaze has been a persistent problem in the industry, a clear understanding of the underlying mechanisms remains elusive. Metal marks are defined as dark lines, often accompanied by damage in the glaze, caused by the deposition of metal during the use of metal utensils. It has been reported that certain types of glazes metal mark to a greater degree than other glazes. In this study, the mechanism of metal marking generation is proposed based on microstructural observations and friction measurements of matte, gloss, and zircon-opacified gloss glazes. Zircon crystallization was also evaluated to verify the efects of crystallization on the glaze properties including surface roughness and friction against metal. Severe metal marking was found in the zircon-opacified glaze; no glaze damage was observed in the matte and gloss glazes. Zircon increases the glaze's coeficient of frction, by the presence of protruding micron-sized zircon particles, resulting in crack formation on the glaze surface and allowing metal particles to be imbedded.