Chapter 27. Modeling of Transient Thermal Damage in Ceramics for Cannon Bore Applications

  1. Edgar Lara-Curzio and
  2. Michael J. Readey
  1. J. H. Underwood,
  2. M. E. Todaro and
  3. G. N. Vigilante

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470291184.ch27

28th International Conference on Advanced Ceramics and Composites A: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 25, Issue 3

28th International Conference on Advanced Ceramics and Composites A: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 25, Issue 3

How to Cite

Underwood, J. H., Todaro, M. E. and Vigilante, G. N. (2004) Modeling of Transient Thermal Damage in Ceramics for Cannon Bore Applications, in 28th International Conference on Advanced Ceramics and Composites A: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 25, Issue 3 (eds E. Lara-Curzio and M. J. Readey), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470291184.ch27

Author Information

  1. Army Armament RD&E Center, Benet Laboratories Building 115, Watervliet, NY 12189

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 2004

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470051498

Online ISBN: 9780470291184

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Keywords:

  • YAG;
  • sic;
  • transient thermal;
  • higher and more sustained;
  • thermo-mechanical

Summary

Laser heating tests and thermomechanical modeling were performed for various ceramics to determine their suitability as a thermal barrier material at a cannon bore. Included were ZrO2, Al2O3, SiAlON, Si3N4, and three types of SiC. the heating was a 4 millisecond pulse of a Nd:YAG laser resulting in about 0.9 J/mm2 total heat input, typical of cannon bore heating during firing. Finite difference and solid mechanics modeling of laser and cannon-gas heating were used to characterize the near-surface thermal damage. Peak model temperature was used to deduce the peak compressive stress from thermal expansion, which was then compared to high-temperature compressive strength of a ceramic as determined from hot-hardness tests. Transient thermal stress leads to failure when it exceeds the reduced high-temperature compressive strength, causing permanent compressive strain and subsequent tensile residual stress and cracking upon cooling. the results indicate that ZrO2 and Al2O3 are unsuitable for large caliber cannon use, showing considerable damage in tests and modeling, while Si3N4, SiAlON and SiC showed only limited damage for cannon firing conditions.