Chapter 58. Chromium Poisoning of Cathodes by Ferritic Stainless Steel

  1. Edgar Lara-Curzio and
  2. Michael J. Readey
  1. T. D. Kaun,
  2. T. A. Cruse and
  3. M. Krumpelt

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470291184.ch58

28th International Conference on Advanced Ceramics and Composites A: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 25, Issue 3

28th International Conference on Advanced Ceramics and Composites A: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 25, Issue 3

How to Cite

Kaun, T. D., Cruse, T. A. and Krumpelt, M. (2004) Chromium Poisoning of Cathodes by Ferritic Stainless Steel, in 28th International Conference on Advanced Ceramics and Composites A: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 25, Issue 3 (eds E. Lara-Curzio and M. J. Readey), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470291184.ch58

Author Information

  1. Argonne National Laboratory Chemical Engineering Div. 9700 S. Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 2004

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470051498

Online ISBN: 9780470291184

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Keywords:

  • SOFC;
  • LSM;
  • LSF;
  • formation of the chromia;
  • SECA

Summary

Chromium poisoning of cathodes has been reported by several groups developing solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) with metallic bipolar plates. Typically, chromium is presumed to migrate from the bipolar plates into the cathode via a volatile oxyhydroxide species. in this paper we report results of experiments where cells measuring 2.5 cm by 2.5 cm were operated with 430 SS and E-Brite bipolar plates and with two different cathode materials. At 700°C, the SOFC degradation rate (percent loss of peak current generating capability) was about 3 times faster than at 800°C. in addition, samples of cathode material coated onto the stainless steel were equilibrated at temperatures of 700°C and 800°C in 25% humid air and analyzed for chromium content. It appears that chromium oxide covering the metal can react chemically with the cathode materials.