Chapter 63. A Mechanistic Model for Particle Deposition in Diesel Particluate Filters Using the Lattice-Boltzmann Technique

  1. Edgar Lara-Curzio and
  2. Michael J. Readey
  1. Mark Stewart and
  2. David Rector

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470291184.ch63

28th International Conference on Advanced Ceramics and Composites A: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 25, Issue 3

28th International Conference on Advanced Ceramics and Composites A: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 25, Issue 3

How to Cite

Stewart, M. and Rector, D. (2004) A Mechanistic Model for Particle Deposition in Diesel Particluate Filters Using the Lattice-Boltzmann Technique, in 28th International Conference on Advanced Ceramics and Composites A: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 25, Issue 3 (eds E. Lara-Curzio and M. J. Readey), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470291184.ch63

Author Information

  1. George Muntean, and Gary Maupin Pacific Northwest National Laboratory PO Box 999, Richland, WA 99352

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 2004

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470051498

Online ISBN: 9780470291184

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Keywords:

  • DPFs;
  • DEER;
  • DPE;
  • PNNL;
  • DOE

Summary

Cordierite diesel particulate filters offer one of the most promising aftertreatment technologies to meet the quickly approaching Environmental Protection Agency 2007 heavy-duty emissions regulations. A critical yet poorly understood component of particulate filter modeling is the representation of soot deposition. the structure and distribution of soot deposits upon and within the ceramic substrate directly influence many of the macroscopic phenomena of interest, including filtration efficiency, back pressure, and filter regeneration. Intrinsic soot cake properties such as packing density and permeability coefficients remain inadequately characterized. the work reported in this paper involves subgrid modeling techniques that may prove useful in resolving these inadequacies. the technique uses a lattice-Boltzmann modeling approach. This approach resolves length scales that are orders of magnitude below those typical of a standard computational fluid dynamics representation of an aftertreatment device. Individual soot particles are introduced and tracked as they move through the flow field and are deposited on the filter substrate or previously deposited particles. Electron micrographs of actual soot deposits are compared with the model predictions.

Descriptions of the modeling technique and the development of the computational domain are provided. Preliminary results and comparisons with experimental observations are presented.