Chapter 68. Stabilization of Counter Electrode for Nasicon Based Potentiometric Co2 Sensor

  1. Edgar Lara-Curzio and
  2. Michael J. Readey
  1. Yuji Miyachi1,
  2. Go Sakai3,
  3. Kengo Shimanoe3 and
  4. Noboru Yamazoe3

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470291184.ch68

28th International Conference on Advanced Ceramics and Composites A: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 25, Issue 3

28th International Conference on Advanced Ceramics and Composites A: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 25, Issue 3

How to Cite

Miyachi, Y., Sakai, G., Shimanoe, K. and Yamazoe, N. (2004) Stabilization of Counter Electrode for Nasicon Based Potentiometric Co2 Sensor, in 28th International Conference on Advanced Ceramics and Composites A: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 25, Issue 3 (eds E. Lara-Curzio and M. J. Readey), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470291184.ch68

Author Information

  1. 1

    Department of Molecular and Material Sciences, Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Engineering

  2. 3

    Department of Material Sciences, Faculty of Engineering Sciences, Kyushu University, 6–1 Kasuga Koen, Kasuga-shi, Fukuoka 816–8580, Japan

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 2004

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470051498

Online ISBN: 9780470291184

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Keywords:

  • BICUVOX;
  • NASICON;
  • fabrication of devices;
  • RH;
  • electrode develops

Summary

Two kinds of materials, Bi2Cu0.1V0.9O3.35 (BICUVOX) and NaCoO2, were investigated for their applicability as the counter electrode for a potentiometric CO2 sensor using NASICON (Na+ conductor, Na3Zr2Si2O12). the BICUVOX counter electrode was more stable than an Au counter electrode. Thermal cycling between the operating temperature (450 °C) and room temperature under various conditions indicated the time needed for the BICUVOX electrode to reach the stationary potential after switching to the operating temperature was unacceptably long. NaCoO2 was found unsuitable as a counter electrode material due to its reactivity with CO2. This reactivity was suppressed completely when NaCoO2 was coated with a layer of glass (SiO2: Na2O: B2O3: Al2O3 = 44:20:31: 5, in molar ratio). the glass-coated NaCoO2 electrode worked well as a counter electrode at 450 °C. Thermal cycling indicated that the glass-coated NaCoO2 electrode exhibited an initial ageing effect. Once aged, glass-coated NaCoO2 showed the properties of a reliable counter electrode, i.e., rapid warm-up characteristics and a reproducible stationary potential at 450 °C.