Chapter 7. Materials for Advanced Battery and Energy Storage Systems (Batteries, Capacitors, Fuel Cells)

  1. Edgar Lara-Curzio and
  2. Michael J. Readey
  1. Alvin J. Salkind

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470291184.ch7

28th International Conference on Advanced Ceramics and Composites A: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 25, Issue 3

28th International Conference on Advanced Ceramics and Composites A: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 25, Issue 3

How to Cite

Salkind, A. J. (2004) Materials for Advanced Battery and Energy Storage Systems (Batteries, Capacitors, Fuel Cells), in 28th International Conference on Advanced Ceramics and Composites A: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 25, Issue 3 (eds E. Lara-Curzio and M. J. Readey), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470291184.ch7

Author Information

  1. Rutgers University, School of Engineering 98 Brett Road Piscataway, NJ 08854

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 2004

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470051498

Online ISBN: 9780470291184

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Keywords:

  • VRLA;
  • DOE;
  • CECOM;
  • CRADA;
  • MH

Summary

The annual production of Electrochemical Energy Storage and Conversion Devices including Batteries, Capacitors and Fuel Cells is approaching a 100 billion value (at manufacturers values). Approximately one half of this amount is the value of materials used in processing or product. These materials include metals, plastics, organic and polymer materials, fabrics, glass, ceramics, inorganic materials, and composites. They are utilized or processed in powders, pastes, films, sheets, fabrics, mats, electrolytes, seals, moldings, fibers, and composites. An overview of the presently used and advanced materials is presented and the needs for further innovations to meet emerging applications described. Some advanced materials studied in the Center for Energy Storage Materials and Engineering at Rutgers University are discussed. They include metal hydrides for the storage of hydrogen, bipolar-NiMH battery designs, manganese-bismuth mixed metal oxides for rechargeable alkaline and lithium cells, and super capacitor materials.