Chapter 86. Indentation Testing of Armor Ceramics

  1. Edgar Lara-Curzio and
  2. Michael J. Readey
  1. Eugene Medvedovski1 and
  2. Partho Sarkar2

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470291184.ch86

28th International Conference on Advanced Ceramics and Composites A: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 25, Issue 3

28th International Conference on Advanced Ceramics and Composites A: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 25, Issue 3

How to Cite

Medvedovski, E. and Sarkar, P. (2004) Indentation Testing of Armor Ceramics, in 28th International Conference on Advanced Ceramics and Composites A: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 25, Issue 3 (eds E. Lara-Curzio and M. J. Readey), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470291184.ch86

Author Information

  1. 1

    Ceramic Protection Corporation 3905–32nd St. N.E. Calgary, AB, T1Y 7C1, Canada

  2. 2

    Alberta Research Council 250 Karl Clark Rd., Edmonton, AB, T6N 1E4, Canada

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 2004

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470051498

Online ISBN: 9780470291184

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Keywords:

  • CPC;
  • ASTM;
  • RBSC;
  • SEM;
  • HRC

Summary

Hardness and fracture toughness are important factors typically used for characterizing armor ceramics. Their values depend on composition and microstructure of the ceramics, on the features of testing methods (e.g. on the type of indentation technique and an indentation load) and on the sample preparation procedure. Vickers and Rockwell indentation commonly used for hardness testing and fracture toughness K1c determined by the indentation method have been studied for different armor ceramics. the sample preparation procedure for the Vickers hardness testing has been optimized in order to increase the accuracy of measurement and to reduce the stresses occurring at indentation. the influence of microstructure for different alumina and carbide-based armor ceramics, as well as the influence of an indentation load, on hardness and fracture toughness have been analyzed. It should be noted, that for dense alumina armor ceramics Vickers hardness can be successfully tested at high indentation loads, such as 10–50 kg, but dense carbide-based armor ceramics may be tested only at indentation loads not greater than 1 kg. Brittleness of ceramics that depends on the hardness to fracture toughness ratio, presence of strong cleavage plane and microstructure should all be considered during selecting a proper hardness testing procedure and the indentation load and also for characterization of armor ceramics. Rockwell hardness testing is recommended as the most suitable method for characterization of heterogeneous materials, such as carbide-based ceramics, where relatively coarser grains are bonded by a fine crystalline-glassy matrix, as well as for ceramic-metal-matrix composites.