Chapter 9. MMCs by Activated Melt Infiltration: High-Melting Alloys and Oxide Ceramics

  1. Edgar Lara-Curzio and
  2. Michael J. Readey
  1. J. Kuebler,
  2. K. Lemster Ph,
  3. Gasser U. E. Klotz and
  4. T. Graule

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470291184.ch9

28th International Conference on Advanced Ceramics and Composites A: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 25, Issue 3

28th International Conference on Advanced Ceramics and Composites A: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 25, Issue 3

How to Cite

Kuebler, J., Lemster Ph, K., Klotz, G. U. E. and Graule, T. (2004) MMCs by Activated Melt Infiltration: High-Melting Alloys and Oxide Ceramics, in 28th International Conference on Advanced Ceramics and Composites A: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 25, Issue 3 (eds E. Lara-Curzio and M. J. Readey), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470291184.ch9

Author Information

  1. Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Testing and Research Ueberlandstrasse 129 8600 Duebendorf, Switzerland

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 2004

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470051498

Online ISBN: 9780470291184

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Keywords:

  • MMCS;
  • MMC;
  • TEM;
  • SEM;
  • JEOL

Summary

For the fabrication of MMCs (Metal Matrix Composites), the infiltration behavior of metallic melts in ceramic substrates is decisive. the use of titanium in pressureless activated melt infiltration for some ceramic/alloy combinations is currently of considerable interest.

Since most ceramics are only poorly wetted by metal melts, an activating element such as titanium or chromium is needed. It is still not known whether the improvement of wetting, and thereby infiltration, is due to the formation of a reaction layer on the ceramic by the active element, or whether titanium is only necessary to promote the beginning of the infiltration process, which may then proceed further via gravitational and capillary forces.

In order to improve the understanding of the infiltration process, time-dependent infiltration experiments have been performed and the obtained microstructures and ceramic-metal interfaces characterized.