17. Thermal Shock Resistance of Nextel ™610 and Nextel ™720 Continuous Fiber-Reinforced Mullite Matrix Composites

  1. Edgar Lara-Curzio and
  2. Michael J. Readey
  1. Reinhard A. Simon1 and
  2. Peter Supancic2

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470291191.ch17

28th International Conference on Advanced Ceramics and Composites B: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 25, Issue 4

28th International Conference on Advanced Ceramics and Composites B: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 25, Issue 4

How to Cite

Simon, R. A. and Supancic, P. (2004) Thermal Shock Resistance of Nextel ™610 and Nextel ™720 Continuous Fiber-Reinforced Mullite Matrix Composites, in 28th International Conference on Advanced Ceramics and Composites B: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 25, Issue 4 (eds E. Lara-Curzio and M. J. Readey), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470291191.ch17

Author Information

  1. 1

    Materials Center Leoben Franz-Josef-Strasse 13 A-8700 Leoben, Austria

  2. 2

    Institut für Struktur- und Funktionskeramik Montanuniversität Leoben, Peter-Tunner-Strasse 5 A-8700 Leoben, Austria

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 2004

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470051528

Online ISBN: 9780470291191

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Keywords:

  • fiber-reinforced ceramic matrix composites;
  • ceramics;
  • thermal shock behavior;
  • anisotropy;
  • tensile test

Summary

In this work the thermal shock behavior of Nextel ™610 and Nextel ™720 continuous fiber-reinforced mullite matrix composites has been investigated using the water quench test. The studied composites consist of 2-D woven fabrics and a mullite matrix containing very fine and homogeneously distributed pores leading to favorable damage-tolerant behavior. The retained interlaminar shear strength and tensile strength with 0°/90° and ±45° fiber orientation was studied as a function of quenching temperature difference up to 800°C. The retained strength and stiffness of the quenched specimens decrease gradually with increasing temperature difference. The major damage modes resulting from thermal shock have been identified and directions for further work are addressed.