44. Atomic Force Microscopy Study of the Surface Degradation Mechanisms of Zirconia Based Ceramics

  1. Edgar Lara-Curzio and
  2. Michael J. Readey
  1. Sylvain Deville1,
  2. Jérôme Chevalier1,
  3. Gilbert Fantozzi1,
  4. Ramón Torrecillas2,
  5. José F. Bartolomé3 and
  6. José S. Moya3

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470291191.ch44

28th International Conference on Advanced Ceramics and Composites B: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 25, Issue 4

28th International Conference on Advanced Ceramics and Composites B: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 25, Issue 4

How to Cite

Deville, S., Chevalier, J., Fantozzi, G., Torrecillas, R., Bartolomé, J. F. and Moya, J. S. (2004) Atomic Force Microscopy Study of the Surface Degradation Mechanisms of Zirconia Based Ceramics, in 28th International Conference on Advanced Ceramics and Composites B: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 25, Issue 4 (eds E. Lara-Curzio and M. J. Readey), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470291191.ch44

Author Information

  1. 1

    National Institute of Applied Science, Materials Department Associate Research Unit 5510 Bat B. Pascal, 20 av. Albert Einstein 69621 Villeurbanne FRANCE

  2. 2

    Instituto Nacional del Carbón C/ Francisco Pintado Fe, 26 La Corredoira 33011 Oviedo SPAIN

  3. 3

    Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid Cantoblanco 28049 Madrid SPAIN

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 2004

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470051528

Online ISBN: 9780470291191

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Keywords:

  • atomic force microscopy;
  • zirconia;
  • ceramics;
  • scanning tunnelling microscopy;
  • atomic force microscopy

Summary

Atomic force microscopy (AFM) can be used to characterise several aspects of the surface degradation and reinforcement mechanisms of zirconia based ceramics, such as crack propagation, martensitic relief formation, grains pull-out and transformation toughening. AFM can also be used to quantify precisely the transformation and provide reliable parameters for long term degradation prediction. In particular, the tetragonal to monoclinic (t-m) phase transformation of zirconia has been the object of extensive investigations of the last twenty years, and is now recognised as being of martensitic nature. New strong evidences supporting the martensitic nature of the transformation are reported here. These observations, considering their scale and precision, are a new step toward the understanding of the t-m phase transformation of zirconia and related degradation mechanisms.