70. Corrosion of Ceramic Materials in Hot Gas Environment

  1. Edgar Lara-Curzio and
  2. Michael J. Readey
  1. Hagen Klemm1,
  2. Marco Fritsch1 and
  3. Bjoern Schenk2

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470291191.ch70

28th International Conference on Advanced Ceramics and Composites B: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 25, Issue 4

28th International Conference on Advanced Ceramics and Composites B: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 25, Issue 4

How to Cite

Klemm, H., Fritsch, M. and Schenk, B. (2004) Corrosion of Ceramic Materials in Hot Gas Environment, in 28th International Conference on Advanced Ceramics and Composites B: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 25, Issue 4 (eds E. Lara-Curzio and M. J. Readey), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470291191.ch70

Author Information

  1. 1

    Fraunhofer-Institut for Ceramic Materials and Sintered Materials, IKTS Dresden Winterbergstr. 28, D-01277 Dresden, Germany

  2. 2

    Honeywell Engines, System & Services 111 S. 34th Street, Phoenix, AZ 85072-2181

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 2004

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470051528

Online ISBN: 9780470291191

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Keywords:

  • thermal degradation;
  • partially yttria stabilized zirconia;
  • thermal banier coatings;
  • x-ray microtomography;
  • yttria stabilized zirconia

Summary

The corrosion resistance of various oxide and non-oxide ceramic materials in hot gas environment was investigated. The tests were performed in a high temperature burner rig at 1450 °C with 100 m/s gas flow speed and a water vapor pressure of 0.27 bar. The corrosion of the materials was characterized by the measurement of the weight balance and microstructural investigations.

Non-oxide ceramic materials based on silicon exhibited the typical degradation behavior with the formation and evaporation of silicon hydroxides. A different behavior was found in case of oxide materials. Meanwhile ZrO2 was found to be stable in this environment, a high corrosion attack was observed for alumina and mullite. Oxide compounds e. g. Rare Earth disilicates or garnet structures decompose with the formation of a fairly dense oxide surface layer protecting the materials from further corrosion.