81. Nanoceramics as Drug Delivery Carriers

  1. Edgar Lara-Curzio and
  2. Michael J. Readey
  1. Waltraud M. Kriven1,
  2. Seo-Young Kwak1,
  3. Matthew A. Wallig2,
  4. Tomas Martin-Jimenez2,
  5. Robert B. Clarkson3,
  6. Barbara E. Kitchell3 and
  7. Jin-Ho Choy4

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470291191.ch81

28th International Conference on Advanced Ceramics and Composites B: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 25, Issue 4

28th International Conference on Advanced Ceramics and Composites B: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 25, Issue 4

How to Cite

Kriven, W. M., Kwak, S.-Y., Wallig, M. A., Martin-Jimenez, T., Clarkson, R. B., Kitchell, B. E. and Choy, J.-H. (2004) Nanoceramics as Drug Delivery Carriers, in 28th International Conference on Advanced Ceramics and Composites B: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 25, Issue 4 (eds E. Lara-Curzio and M. J. Readey), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470291191.ch81

Author Information

  1. 1

    Department of Materials Science and Engineering University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign 1304, West Green Street Urbana, IL 61801

  2. 2

    Department of Veterinary Biosciences University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign 2001 South Lincoln, Urbana, IL 61802

  3. 3

    Department of Veterinary Clinical Medicine University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign 1008 West Hazelwood Drive Urbana, IL 61802

  4. 4

    School of Chemistry Seoul National University San 56-1, Shilim, Kwanak, 151-747, Korea

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 2004

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470051528

Online ISBN: 9780470291191

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Keywords:

  • calcium aluminate system;
  • ion beam microscopy;
  • scanning electron microscopy;
  • osteoporosis;
  • osteopenic bone

Summary

Nano-scaled ceramic particles, such as layered double hydroxides (LDHs) have been developed to preserve and deliver drugs or genes in biological cells. Unstable molecules were intercalated into LDHs displacing the Cl ions, shielding the drug or gene's anionic charge and enabling penetration into the cell. In the slightly acidic environment of the cell, the ceramic nanoplatelets of ∼100 nm diameter dissolved, releasing the intercalates in a controlled manner. Indeed, the chelate diethylenetriamine-N, N, N′, N″, N″-pentaacetate (DTPA), complexed with Gd3+ or VO2+ showed their characteristic EPR spectra with a slow tumbling environment in the LDH matrix. Preliminary safety studies with rats showed that there were no systemic effects as demonstrated by clinical chemistry and histopathology. In vitro studies indicated that pristine LDH nanohybrid material had no cytotoxic or growth inhibitory effects. LDH intercalated with disodium pamidronate (Aredia ™) have successfully been synthesized. From pharmacokinetic in vivo studies, we can suggest the possibility of using LDH bioresorbable nanoparticles as carriers for slowrelease, intravenous drug administration.