82. Chemical Processing of Brushite: Its Conversion to Apatite or Ca2P2O7

  1. Edgar Lara-Curzio and
  2. Michael J. Readey
  1. A. Cuneyt Tas and
  2. Sarit B. Bhaduri

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470291191.ch82

28th International Conference on Advanced Ceramics and Composites B: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 25, Issue 4

28th International Conference on Advanced Ceramics and Composites B: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 25, Issue 4

How to Cite

Tas, A. C. and Bhaduri, S. B. (2008) Chemical Processing of Brushite: Its Conversion to Apatite or Ca2P2O7, in 28th International Conference on Advanced Ceramics and Composites B: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 25, Issue 4 (eds E. Lara-Curzio and M. J. Readey), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470291191.ch82

Author Information

  1. School of Materials Science and Engineering, Clemson University, Clemson, SC 29634

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 2004

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470051528

Online ISBN: 9780470291191

SEARCH

Keywords:

  • novel hydroxyapatite;
  • titanium nitrides;
  • plasma spray process;
  • electrode materials;
  • direct current arc plasma

Summary

Brushite (DCPD: CaHPO42H2O) powders were chemically synthesized by using Na- and K-phosphate and calcium chloride-containing aqueous solutions at RT, followed by drying at 37°C. DCPD powders thus formed were found to contain 460 ppm K. and 945 ppm Na. Upon calcining in air these powders readily transformed into CaHPO4 (monetite) first, and then into Ca2P2O7. Na- and K-doped DCPD powders were shown to completely transform, in less than 1 week, into poorly crystalline carbonated apatite upon immersion in an acellular SBF solution at 37°C. This finding suggests the use of these DCPD powders as potential bone-substitute materials, which can be easily manufactured in aqueous solutions friendly to living tissues at temperatures between RT and 37°C.