83. Chemical Interactions between Ca-Aluminate Implants and Bone

  1. Edgar Lara-Curzio and
  2. Michael J. Readey
  1. H. Engqvist1,
  2. M. Couillard2,
  3. G. A. Botton2,
  4. N. Axén1,
  5. N. O. Ahnfelt1 and
  6. L. Hermansson1

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470291191.ch83

28th International Conference on Advanced Ceramics and Composites B: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 25, Issue 4

28th International Conference on Advanced Ceramics and Composites B: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 25, Issue 4

How to Cite

Engqvist, H., Couillard, M., Botton, G. A., Axén, N., Ahnfelt, N. O. and Hermansson, L. (2004) Chemical Interactions between Ca-Aluminate Implants and Bone, in 28th International Conference on Advanced Ceramics and Composites B: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 25, Issue 4 (eds E. Lara-Curzio and M. J. Readey), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470291191.ch83

Author Information

  1. 1

    Doxa AB, Axel Johanssons gata 4-6, SE-751 26 Uppsala, Sweden

  2. 2

    Brockhouse Institute for Materials Research, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, L8S 4M1, Canada

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 2004

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470051528

Online ISBN: 9780470291191

SEARCH

Keywords:

  • tooth restorations;
  • zirconia dental crowns;
  • gingival retraction;
  • electrophoretic deposition;
  • tetramethylamoniumhydroxide

Summary

This article describes a novel injectable ceramic based on the calcium aluminate system, especially designed for orthopaedic treatment of e. g. vertebral compression fractures, metaphyseal fractures and cranio-facial restoration. The article focuses particularly on the chemical interactions between the Ca-aluminate based material and bone tissue. The interface between bone and the ceramic material after 6 weeks of implantation in a model involving injection of the non-cured paste into drilled cavities in the tibia of rabbits was evaluated. Optical microscopy, focused ion beam microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy combined with energy dispersive spectroscopy and electron diffraction have been used in the evaluation. The studies reveal the material to be bioactive, i. e. to form chemical bonding between the filler material and bone tissue.