87. Scratch Testing of a Dental Restorative Material Based on Calcium Aluminate

  1. Edgar Lara-Curzio and
  2. Michael J. Readey
  1. Anna Pallas1,
  2. Håkan Engqvist1,
  3. S. Jacobsson2 and
  4. Leif Hermansson1

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470291191.ch87

28th International Conference on Advanced Ceramics and Composites B: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 25, Issue 4

28th International Conference on Advanced Ceramics and Composites B: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 25, Issue 4

How to Cite

Pallas, A., Engqvist, H., Jacobsson, S. and Hermansson, L. (2004) Scratch Testing of a Dental Restorative Material Based on Calcium Aluminate, in 28th International Conference on Advanced Ceramics and Composites B: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 25, Issue 4 (eds E. Lara-Curzio and M. J. Readey), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470291191.ch87

Author Information

  1. 1

    Doxa AB, Axel Johanssons gata 4-6, SE-751 26 Uppsala, Sweden

  2. 2

    Dept. of Materials Science, The Ångström Laboratory, Uppsala University, Sweden

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 2004

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470051528

Online ISBN: 9780470291191

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Keywords:

  • pore-free microstructures;
  • alumina suspensions;
  • high temperature applications;
  • electrophoretic deposition;
  • submicron powders

Summary

To study the basic abrasive wear mechanisms of a new bioceramic dental restorative material scratch testing has been conducted. The material is a chemically bonded bioceramic with calcium aluminate as binder. It is intended to be used in small and medium sized posterior class I, II and V fillings. A spherical diamond tip scratched the surface under increasing load from O to 50 N. The scratch hardness was measured and the wear mechanisms were classified according to the scale suggested by Powers. For comparison a glass-ionomer cement and a polymer composite were also tested. The scratched surfaces were studied with light optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The bioceramic material had a lower scratch hardness than that of the composite but higher than that of the glass-ionomer. Regarding the wear mechanisms, the bioceramic material showed a plastic deformation up to about 15 N and above cracking and flaking began. The composite material did not enter into a more severe wear until 35 N. The glass-ionomer cement was more unreliable and some samples broke completely already at low loads or showed extensive cracking.