10. Computer Modeling of Crack Propagation Using Fractal Geometry

  1. Edgar Lara-Curzio
  1. George W. Quinn1,
  2. Janet B. Quinn2,
  3. John J. Mecholsky Jr.3 and
  4. George D. Quinn4

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470291221.ch10

Mechanical Properties and Performance of Engineering Ceramics and Composites: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 26, Number 2

Mechanical Properties and Performance of Engineering Ceramics and Composites: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 26, Number 2

How to Cite

Quinn, G. W., Quinn, J. B., Mecholsky, J. J. and Quinn, G. D. (2005) Computer Modeling of Crack Propagation Using Fractal Geometry, in Mechanical Properties and Performance of Engineering Ceramics and Composites: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 26, Number 2 (ed E. Lara-Curzio), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470291221.ch10

Author Information

  1. 1

    National Institute of Standards and Technology STOP 8940 Gaithersburg, MD, 20899-8940

  2. 2

    ADAF Paffenbarger Research Center National Institute of Standards and Technology STOP 8546 Gaithersburg, MD, 20899-8546

  3. 3

    Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering University of Florida Gainesville, FL, 32611

  4. 4

    National Institute of Standards and Technology STOP 8520 Gaithersburg, MD, 20899-8520

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 2005

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781574982329

Online ISBN: 9780470291221

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Keywords:

  • fractography;
  • glass disks;
  • initial branching distance;
  • lindenmayer model;
  • wild stereo optical microscope

Summary

A model of the propagation of two-dimension traveling cracks in a biaxially-stressed glass disk was derived using concepts of fractal geometry. A computer program employing this model was written using known fractographic equations, empirical observations and generic algorithms for generating fractals. Inputs include material property data, fracture load, disk size and the sizes of the load-bearing rings. The outputs include fracture stress, initial crack size before branching, and a prediction of the expected number of radial cracks. A typical image of a fractured disk with the input conditions is also produced. The image incorporates empirically-determined randomness and a degree of crack curvature dependent on the stress state. The program is user-friendly, and may be easily adapted for other materials and conditions.