22. Structuring Ceramics Using Lithography

  1. Edgar Lara-Curzio
  1. Michael Schulz1,2,
  2. Jürgen Haußelt1,2 and
  3. Richard Heldele1,2

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470291221.ch22

Mechanical Properties and Performance of Engineering Ceramics and Composites: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 26, Number 2

Mechanical Properties and Performance of Engineering Ceramics and Composites: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 26, Number 2

How to Cite

Schulz, M., Haußelt, J. and Heldele, R. (2005) Structuring Ceramics Using Lithography, in Mechanical Properties and Performance of Engineering Ceramics and Composites: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 26, Number 2 (ed E. Lara-Curzio), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470291221.ch22

Author Information

  1. 1

    Institute of Materials Research III Research Center Karlsruhe P. O. Box 3640 Karlsruhe, 76021 Germany

  2. 2

    Albert-Ludwigs-Universität Freiburg Institute of Microsystem Technology Georges-Köhler-Allee 102 Freiburg, 79110 Germany

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 2005

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781574982329

Online ISBN: 9780470291221

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Keywords:

  • ceramic feedstocks;
  • lithographic methods;
  • post exposure bake;
  • silicon organic compounds;
  • ceramic powder

Summary

Due to their outstanding chemical stability the application of ceramic micro components is becoming more and more important. Different replication techniques like low or high pressure injection molding of ceramic feedstocks have been established in the industrial process. The success of microelectronics and microsystem technologies is based on the development of various lithographic methods. These can be used to produce very precise micro patterned components from plastic, ceramic, or metal with minimal line width.

Silicon organic compounds containing the elements silicon, nitrogen, and carbon in the polymer backbone can serve as precursors for Si3N4, SiC or Si-C-N ceramics depending on the pyrolysis atmosphere. These so-called preceramic polymers react as negative type resists in lithography. By applying lithography, ceramic micro components can be produced using established photo resins filled with ceramic powder as well as preceramic polymers. To guarantee dimensional reproducibility, substrates made from the same material were manufactured. By adding ceramic powder to the polymeric matrix and adapting the dispersion method the properties of the resulting ceramic microparts were optimized. Different ceramic micro test structures were produced from unfilled and ceramic powder filled preceramic polymers. High aspect ratios with smallest structural details of several micrometers were achieved depending on the lithographic method (UV- or X-ray) and the masks used. An overview over the process and the current results will be given.