48. Effect of Active Fillers on Ceramic Joints Derived from Preceramic Polymers

  1. Edgar Lara-Curzio
  1. C. A. Lewinsohn1,
  2. S. Rao2 and
  3. R. Bordia3

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470291221.ch48

Mechanical Properties and Performance of Engineering Ceramics and Composites: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 26, Number 2

Mechanical Properties and Performance of Engineering Ceramics and Composites: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 26, Number 2

How to Cite

Lewinsohn, C. A., Rao, S. and Bordia, R. (2005) Effect of Active Fillers on Ceramic Joints Derived from Preceramic Polymers, in Mechanical Properties and Performance of Engineering Ceramics and Composites: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 26, Number 2 (ed E. Lara-Curzio), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470291221.ch48

Author Information

  1. 1

    Ceramatec Inc. Salt Lake City, UT, 84119

  2. 2

    The University of Washington Seattle, WA, 99352.

  3. 3

    The University of Washington Seattle, WA, 99352.

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 2005

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781574982329

Online ISBN: 9780470291221

SEARCH

Keywords:

  • preceramic polymers;
  • dilatomee;
  • ceramic materials;
  • microscopy;
  • silicon carbide

Summary

Pyrolysis of preceramic polymers has been proposed as a method for obtaining bonds between silicon carbide at relatively low processing temperatures. Shrinkage and evolution of gaseous species during pyrolysis of preceramic polymer-based joints, however, can give rise to strength limiting defects. In this work, the use of various reactive fillers to mitigate shrinkage was investigated. Dilatometry was used to measure shrinkage and x-ray diffraction was used to detect the onset of reactions between the filler phases and the preceramic polymer material. The effects of processing conditions, filler concentrations, and applied pressure on joint strength were also studied. Microscopy was used to complement mechanical testing. This talk will present the findings of this study and directions for additional development.