12. Microstructure and Phase Constituents of the Thermally Grown Oxide in Thermal Barrier Coatings

  1. Dongming Zhu and
  2. Kevin Plucknett
  1. S. Laxman1,2,
  2. H. Heinrich1,3 and
  3. Y. H. Sohn1,2

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470291238.ch12

Advances in Ceramic Coatings and Ceramic-Metal Systems: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 26, Number 3

Advances in Ceramic Coatings and Ceramic-Metal Systems: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 26, Number 3

How to Cite

Laxman, S., Heinrich, H. and Sohn, Y. H. (2005) Microstructure and Phase Constituents of the Thermally Grown Oxide in Thermal Barrier Coatings, in Advances in Ceramic Coatings and Ceramic-Metal Systems: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 26, Number 3 (eds D. Zhu and K. Plucknett), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470291238.ch12

Author Information

  1. 1

    Advanced Materials Processing and Analysis Center

  2. 2

    Department of Mechanical, Materials and Aerospace Engineering

  3. 3

    Department of Physics University of Central Florida Orlando, FL 32816

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 2005

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781574982336

Online ISBN: 9780470291238

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Keywords:

  • microscopy;
  • polymorphic;
  • microstructure;
  • thermodynamics;
  • morphology

Summary

The thermally grown oxide (TGO) scale in thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) has been frequently associated with the durability and reliability of TBCs. In this study, the microstructure and phase constituents of the TGO scale were examined using transmission and scanning transmission electron microscopy (TEM/STEM). The TGO scales in several types of TBCs were examined before and after initial thermal cyclic oxidation that represents 10% of their lifetimes. Results from TEM/STEM are presented with emphasis on the polymorphic constituents of AI2O3, constituents of the mixed oxide zone, reactive-element oxides, and Ni/Co rich oxides, formation of voids, and integrity of critical interfaces.