27. Cermet and Hard Metal Coatings for Advanced Large Diesel Engines with Reduced Pollutant Emissions

  1. Dongming Zhu and
  2. Kevin Plucknett
  1. Antonio Candel,
  2. Rainer Gadow and
  3. Daniel López

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470291238.ch27

Advances in Ceramic Coatings and Ceramic-Metal Systems: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 26, Number 3

Advances in Ceramic Coatings and Ceramic-Metal Systems: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 26, Number 3

How to Cite

Candel, A., Gadow, R. and López, D. (2005) Cermet and Hard Metal Coatings for Advanced Large Diesel Engines with Reduced Pollutant Emissions, in Advances in Ceramic Coatings and Ceramic-Metal Systems: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 26, Number 3 (eds D. Zhu and K. Plucknett), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470291238.ch27

Author Information

  1. University of Stuttgart Allmandring 7 b D-70569 Stuttgart, Baden-Württemberg, 70569

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 2005

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781574982336

Online ISBN: 9780470291238

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Keywords:

  • propulsion;
  • combustion;
  • carbon;
  • hypersonic;
  • equipment

Summary

Due to the extraordinary requirements in service and operation of high power diesel marine propulsion engines, and to the long working periods as well as harsh operation conditions, a long operation life cycle, reliability and availability must be sustained.

In ship diesel engines, wear usually occurs in the top region of the cylinder liner, where the maximum mechanical and thermal load appears. Modern high pressure direct fuel injection engines (i.e. common rail and pump injector systems) in combustion with high rate turbo charging increases the combustion temperature, pressure and flame propagation.

Moreover, abrasive wear mechanism occurs due to the high quantity of abrasive particles and carbon depositions on the piston surface, coming from the heavy fuels combustion and oil degradation. Therefore the mermomechanically and tribologically highly loaded top region are subjected to premature local cylinder damage. This leads to the necessity of a reinforcement of the highly loaded areas by means of advanced materials engineering. State of the art is the use of exchangeable cylinder liner top rings made from hardened steel, placed on the highly loaded areas. This solution has the disadvantage that two different components and materials are used, leading to a reduced heat transfer and elaborate construction and assembly.

At the IMTCCC, together with the leading Spanish marine engine manufacturer IZAR, an investigation is being developed, in order to obtain a carbon deposition reducing coating insert by means of HVOF thermal spray techniques.