14. Study of Praseodyium Strontium Manganite for the Potential Use as a Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Cathode

  1. Narottam P. Bansal
  1. Matthew E. Pfluge1,
  2. Max C. Deibert1,
  3. Greg W. Coffey2 and
  4. Larry R. Pederson2

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470291245.ch14

Advances in Solid Oxide Fuel Cells: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 26, Number 4

Advances in Solid Oxide Fuel Cells: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 26, Number 4

How to Cite

Pfluge, M. E., Deibert, M. C., Coffey, G. W. and Pederson, L. R. (2005) Study of Praseodyium Strontium Manganite for the Potential Use as a Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Cathode, in Advances in Solid Oxide Fuel Cells: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 26, Number 4 (ed N. P. Bansal), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470291245.ch14

Author Information

  1. 1

    Montana State University Bozeman, MT 59715

  2. 2

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, WA 99352

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 2005

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781574982343

Online ISBN: 9780470291245

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Keywords:

  • lanthanum strontium manganite;
  • spectra;
  • seebeck measurement;
  • thermocouple;
  • hausmannite phase

Summary

Extensive research has been performed on solid oxide fuel cell cathodes. These cathodes have a multitude of performance restrictions, such as stability in an oxidation environment, have sufficient electrical conductivity, and catalytic activity for the oxidant gas reaction at the appropriate operating temperature. Also the cathode must be chemically and thermally compatible with the other cell components from room temperature to the operating temperature and even to higher fabrication temperatures. Praseodymium strontium manganite (PSM) has shown promising electrical properties with respect to idealistic properties of cathodes in solid oxide fuel cells. Various dopant levels of strontium in the perovskite structure were investigated, which include Pr1-xSrxMnO3-δ where x = 0.10, 0.20, 0.30 and (Pr1-xSrx)0.98MnO3-δ where x = 0.20 and 0.30. This cathodic material has shown electrical conductivity over twice as high as a traditionally used cathode material, La0.8Sr0.2MnO3. Through this investigation, the electrical conductivities of this ceramic series were measured from 200°C to 950°C. Within the same temperature range the Seebeck coefficient was also investigated. This coefficient is a measurement of the change in voltage across a temperature gradient and thus can be referred to as its thermal power. This measurement provides a better overall understanding of the high electrical conductivity displayed within the material.