2. Interfacial Processes of Ion Conducting Ceramic Materials for Advanced Chemical Sensors

  1. Sheng Yao,
  2. Bruce Tuttle,
  3. Clive Randall and
  4. Dwight Viehland
  1. Werner Weppner

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470291252.ch2

Advances in Electronic Ceramic Materials: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 26, Number 5

Advances in Electronic Ceramic Materials: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 26, Number 5

How to Cite

Weppner, W. (2005) Interfacial Processes of Ion Conducting Ceramic Materials for Advanced Chemical Sensors, in Advances in Electronic Ceramic Materials: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 26, Number 5 (eds S. Yao, B. Tuttle, C. Randall and D. Viehland), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470291252.ch2

Author Information

  1. Chair for Sensors and Solid State Ionics, Faculty of Engineering, Christian-Albrechts University, Kaiserstr. 2, 24143 Kiel, Germany

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 2005

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781574982350

Online ISBN: 9780470291252

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Keywords:

  • galvanic cells;
  • amplitude;
  • diffusion;
  • morphology;
  • chemically

Summary

Ceramic electrochemical gas and fluid sensors are mainly based on potentiometric or amperometric principles. Steady state equilibria are established between the gas or fluid and the surface of the electrolyte or electrode and across a diffusion barrier, respectively. The electrostatic potential drop of the galvanic cells depends on the charging of double layers between the phases in contact with each other. A transfer of electrons and ions has to occur across these interfaces. The kinetics of the various limiting factors, i. e. polarizations, is taken into consideration for determining the partial pressures of single and multiple gas compositions. Time dependent currents and voltages are applied which provide driving forces for diffusion, absorption and charge transfer processes of the electroactive species. These devices are called theta (Θ) sensors. Favorably, periodic electrical signals are being employed. The signal - response behavior may be optimized by selecting appropriate frequencies, amplitudes and shapes of the electrical signal as well as favorable chemistry and morphology of the employed materials. Experimental verifications of interface phenomena based ceramic chemical sensors are being presented.