10. Self-Setting Orthopedic Cement Compositions Based on CaHPO4 Additions to Calcium Sulphate

  1. Mineo Mizuno
  1. J. N. Swaintek1,
  2. C. J. Han1,
  3. A. C. Tas2 and
  4. S. B. Bhaduri2

Published Online: 27 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470291269.ch10

Advances in Bioceramics and Biocomposites: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 26, Number 6

Advances in Bioceramics and Biocomposites: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 26, Number 6

How to Cite

Swaintek, J. N., Han, C. J., Tas, A. C. and Bhaduri, S. B. (2005) Self-Setting Orthopedic Cement Compositions Based on CaHPO4 Additions to Calcium Sulphate, in Advances in Bioceramics and Biocomposites: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 26, Number 6 (ed M. Mizuno), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470291269.ch10

Author Information

  1. 1

    S. C Governor's School for Science and Mathematics, Hartsville, SC 29550

  2. 2

    School of Materials Science and Engineering, Clemson University, Clemson, SC 29634

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 27 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 2005

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781574982367

Online ISBN: 9780470291269

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Keywords:

  • mechanical;
  • inflammatory;
  • osteoconductivity;
  • biphasic;
  • moxphology

Summary

Calcium sulphate-based cements depend on the setting reaction between water and calcium sulphate hemihydrate (CSH, CaSO4.1/2H2O) to form calcium sulphate dihydrate (CSD, Gypsum, CaSO4.2H2O) as the reaction product Rapid formation of gypsum needles provides the resultant material its initial, dry cohesive strength. Such weak cements, in the form of granules, pellets or cement pastes, are commercially available as bone defect fillers in clinical orthopedic applications. However, pure calcium sulphate cements rapidly deteriorate in aqueous solutions and crumble into a powder. Calcium sulphate cements are also not able to maintain their dry strength when soaked in human blood plasma or synthetic body fluids at 37°C. Additions of calcium phosphate powders (5 to 33 wt%), such as CaHPO4 (DCPA, dicalcium phosphate anhydrous, monetite) to CSH were found to significantly increase the wet mechanical integrity of these new cements. In vitro apatite-inducing ability of pure gypsum cements and the DCPA-doped calcium sulphate cements were compared by soaking those in a tris-buffered, 27 mM HCO3-- containing synthetic body fluid (SBF) solution for 1 week. While the gypsum cement samples were not able to form any carbonated apatitic calcium phosphates on their surfaces, DCPA-doped cement samples were covered with a thick layer of carbonated, apatitic calcium phosphate. Moreover, the DCPA-doped gypsum cements kept their initial mechanical strength after 1 week of soaking in the SBF solution. Samples of pure gypsum cements, on the other hand, simply disintegrated into loose powders during the same SBF soaking.