15. In Situ and Long Term Evaluation of Calcium Phosphate Cement Behavior in Animal Experiment

  1. Mineo Mizuno
  1. Masashi Mukaida1,
  2. Masashi Neo1,
  3. Takashi Nakamura1,
  4. Yasutoshi Mizuta2,
  5. Yasushi Ikceda2 and
  6. Mineo Mizuno2

Published Online: 27 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470291269.ch15

Advances in Bioceramics and Biocomposites: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 26, Number 6

Advances in Bioceramics and Biocomposites: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 26, Number 6

How to Cite

Mukaida, M., Neo, M., Nakamura, T., Mizuta, Y., Ikceda, Y. and Mizuno, M. (2005) In Situ and Long Term Evaluation of Calcium Phosphate Cement Behavior in Animal Experiment, in Advances in Bioceramics and Biocomposites: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 26, Number 6 (ed M. Mizuno), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470291269.ch15

Author Information

  1. 1

    Department of Orthopedic Surgery Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, 54 Kawahara-cho, Shogoin, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto, 606–8507 Japan

  2. 2

    Japan fine Ceramics Center, 2–4–1, Mutsuno, Atsuta-ku, Nagoya, 456–8587 Japan

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 27 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 2005

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781574982367

Online ISBN: 9780470291269

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Keywords:

  • biomataiels;
  • mechanism;
  • chondroitin;
  • geometry;
  • cylinders

Summary

High-resolution X-ray CT is a powerful means of analyzing a comprehensive range of ceramic biomaterials in vivo. The benefit of this method is that morphological and volume changes of implant materials can be evaluated without retrieval of the implant, allowing animal viability to be maintained and allowing long-term repeated evaluation.

In this study, in situ techniques for the observation of calcium phosphate cement (CPC) were developed. CPC was implanted into the femur and under the skin of rats. The volume and morphology change of the CPC were repeatedly measured in the same rats for more than 12 months.

The structure of the CPC was visualized in three dimensions (3-D), and its volume was quantified using 3-D structure analysis software, which enabled two-value processing and estimation of the quantities of the CPC. Moreover, some CPC samples were retrieved and observed by SEM.

The surface of the CPC changed from smooth to jagged as time increased. The volume of CPC implanted into bone gradually decreased with time. The volume loss was 8% after 12 months. The volume of the CPC implanted subcutaneously increased by 7% in one month, and subsequently decreased gradually.

HRXCT was found to be a powerful means for analyzing biomaterials such as porous ceramics and bone cements in vivo.