16. Resorption Rate Tunable Bioceramic: Si&Zn-Modified Tricacium Phosphate

  1. Mineo Mizuno
  1. Xiang Wei1 and
  2. Mufit Akinc2

Published Online: 27 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470291269.ch16

Advances in Bioceramics and Biocomposites: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 26, Number 6

Advances in Bioceramics and Biocomposites: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 26, Number 6

How to Cite

Wei, X. and Akinc, M. (2005) Resorption Rate Tunable Bioceramic: Si&Zn-Modified Tricacium Phosphate, in Advances in Bioceramics and Biocomposites: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 26, Number 6 (ed M. Mizuno), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470291269.ch16

Author Information

  1. 1

    Iowa State University Department of Materials Science and Engineering 322 Spedding Hall Ames, IA, 50011

  2. 2

    Iowa State University Department of Materials Science and Engineering, 2220C Hoover Hall Ames, IA, 50011

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 27 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 2005

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781574982367

Online ISBN: 9780470291269

SEARCH

Keywords:

  • biphasic;
  • dissolution;
  • osteogenesis;
  • diffiactometer;
  • silicocamotite

Summary

An ideal bone implant material would support the activity of osteoblasts in the development of new bone, while simultaneously being resorbed by osteoclasts as part of the lifelong orderly process of bone remodeling. Silicon and Zinc modified tricalcium phosphate, a biphasic material, was synthesized as a candidate for resorbable temporal bone implant having a controlled solubility and pharmaceutical effect to promote bone formation. From XRD and ICP analyses, it was shown that up to 10mol% Si and Zn can be incorporated in tricalcium phosphate (TCP) without formation of a secondary phase. Changes in lattice parameters and unit volume of TCP as calculated by Rietveld analysis indicate that Si and Zn substitute for P and Ca respectively. The dissolution study was carried out in simulated body fluid. The chemical analysis and XRD results imply that the Si and Zn additives not only decrease the solubility of TCP, but also slow hydroxyapatite (HAp) precipitation, indicating that dissolution of temporary implant and formation of new bone may be tailored by the level of Si and Zn substitution.