3. Synthesis and Sintering Studies of Nanocrystalline Hydroxyapatite Powders Doped with Magnesium and Zinc

  1. Mineo Mizuno
  1. Himesh Bhatt1 and
  2. Samar J. Kalita2

Published Online: 27 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470291269.ch3

Advances in Bioceramics and Biocomposites: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 26, Number 6

Advances in Bioceramics and Biocomposites: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 26, Number 6

How to Cite

Bhatt, H. and Kalita, S. J. (2005) Synthesis and Sintering Studies of Nanocrystalline Hydroxyapatite Powders Doped with Magnesium and Zinc, in Advances in Bioceramics and Biocomposites: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 26, Number 6 (ed M. Mizuno), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470291269.ch3

Author Information

  1. 1

    Department of Mechanical, Materials and Aerospace Engineering, University of Central Florida P.O. Box 162450 Orlando, FL-32816–2450

  2. 2

    Department of Mechanical, Materials and Aerospace Engineering, University of Central Florida P.O. Box 162450 Orlando, FL-32816–2450

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 27 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 2005

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781574982367

Online ISBN: 9780470291269

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Keywords:

  • magnesium;
  • bioceramic;
  • radiation;
  • agglomeration;
  • hydroxyapatite

Summary

In this research, we have synthesized nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite (Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2, HAp) powders doped with magnesium and zinc using the water-based sol-gel technique and characterized them. Calcium nitrate and triethyl phosphite were used as starting materials. These chemicals were dissolved in distilled water, separately, under vigorous stirring. As-prepared calcium nitrate sol was added drop wise into the hydrolyzed phosphite sol and then aged and dried. Dried gel was then crushed into fine white powders with the help of mortar and pestle and a measured amount of magnesium oxide and zinc oxide powders were added to the crushed amorphous powders, separately. Calcination was carried out at 250–500°C. Morphology of the powders was determined using transmission electron microscopy. TEM results revealed that the particle size diameter of powders were in the range of 5–10 nm. Phase analyses were carried out using powder X-ray diffraction technique. As-synthesized powders were also pressed uniaxially in a steel mold to prepare dense ceramic structures. These green structures were sintered at 1300°C for 6 h in a muffle furnace for densification. Highest sintered density of 3.29 g/cc was measured for magnesium-doped powder.