1. Some Observations on the Strength of Failed Ceramic

  1. Jeffrey J. Swab
  1. Gordon R. Johnson and
  2. Timothy J. Holmquist

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470291276.ch1

Advances in Ceramic Armor: A Collection of Papers Presented at the 29th International Conference on Advanced Ceramics and Composites, January 23-28, 2005, Cocoa Beach, Florida, Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 26, Number 7

Advances in Ceramic Armor: A Collection of Papers Presented at the 29th International Conference on Advanced Ceramics and Composites, January 23-28, 2005, Cocoa Beach, Florida, Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 26, Number 7

How to Cite

Johnson, G. R. and Holmquist, T. J. (2005) Some Observations on the Strength of Failed Ceramic, in Advances in Ceramic Armor: A Collection of Papers Presented at the 29th International Conference on Advanced Ceramics and Composites, January 23-28, 2005, Cocoa Beach, Florida, Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 26, Number 7 (ed J. J. Swab), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470291276.ch1

Author Information

  1. Network Computing Services, Inc. P. O. Box 581459 Minneapolis, Minnesota, 55415

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 2005

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781574982374

Online ISBN: 9780470291276

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Keywords:

  • stnngth of failed ceramic;
  • problems inasmuch;
  • failed strength;
  • drop suddenly;
  • straightforward process

Summary

This article presents some observations on the strength of failed ceramic under conditions of high-velocity impact. Included are results of recent computations that provide good agreement with a variety of test data, as well as an explanation of the techniques used to represent the damage and strength of the ceramic as it transitions from intact to failed material. For most of the examples noted in this article the damage and failed strength are determined from impact and penetration computations, and are not measured directly from laboratory tests. Some direct test data for failed ceramics have been generated and reported in the literature; they tend to show a great deal of scatter, they tend to not cover the range of pressures and other variables experienced during high-velocity impact and penetration, and they are generally not in agreement with the corresponding data obtained from the computations. Some observations are presented to explain some of these apparent discrepancies and to show the relative effects of intact strength, failed strength and damage.