10. The Correlation of Microstructural and Mechanical Characteristics of Silicon Carbide with Ballistic Performance

  1. Jeffrey J. Swab
  1. Ian Pickup

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470291276.ch10

Advances in Ceramic Armor: A Collection of Papers Presented at the 29th International Conference on Advanced Ceramics and Composites, January 23-28, 2005, Cocoa Beach, Florida, Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 26, Number 7

Advances in Ceramic Armor: A Collection of Papers Presented at the 29th International Conference on Advanced Ceramics and Composites, January 23-28, 2005, Cocoa Beach, Florida, Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 26, Number 7

How to Cite

Pickup, I. (2005) The Correlation of Microstructural and Mechanical Characteristics of Silicon Carbide with Ballistic Performance, in Advances in Ceramic Armor: A Collection of Papers Presented at the 29th International Conference on Advanced Ceramics and Composites, January 23-28, 2005, Cocoa Beach, Florida, Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 26, Number 7 (ed J. J. Swab), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470291276.ch10

Author Information

  1. Dstl Porton Down Salisbury Wiltshire SP4 0JQ, UK

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 2005

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781574982374

Online ISBN: 9780470291276

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Keywords:

  • static testing;
  • fractogrephic studies;
  • microstructure;
  • poisson ratio;
  • young modulus

Summary

The ballistic response to tungsten long rod penetrator attack of two silicon carbide variants has been characterised. The variants, (SiC B, Cercom Inc. and SiC 100, Ceramique et Composite) which have nominally similar densities and quasi-static mechanical properties, exhibit significant differences in ballistic performance. This is shown to be a result of the different dwell response of the variants, i.e. the propensity to erode the rods on the surface without significant penetration.

The paper reviews methods developed to dynamically and statically characterise the two materials to determine deviatoric strength and a measure of the damage kinetics; the former from Plate Impact experiments and the latter from Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar techniques. Microstructural and fractographic studies are employed to elucidate the relative mechanical behavioural characteristics which are in turn related to the ballistic performance.