14. Damage Effects on the Dynamic Response of Hot-Pressed SiC-N

  1. Jeffrey J. Swab
  1. H. Luo1 and
  2. W. Chen2

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470291276.ch14

Advances in Ceramic Armor: A Collection of Papers Presented at the 29th International Conference on Advanced Ceramics and Composites, January 23-28, 2005, Cocoa Beach, Florida, Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 26, Number 7

Advances in Ceramic Armor: A Collection of Papers Presented at the 29th International Conference on Advanced Ceramics and Composites, January 23-28, 2005, Cocoa Beach, Florida, Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 26, Number 7

How to Cite

Luo, H. and Chen, W. (2005) Damage Effects on the Dynamic Response of Hot-Pressed SiC-N, in Advances in Ceramic Armor: A Collection of Papers Presented at the 29th International Conference on Advanced Ceramics and Composites, January 23-28, 2005, Cocoa Beach, Florida, Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 26, Number 7 (ed J. J. Swab), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470291276.ch14

Author Information

  1. 1

    Dept. of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering The University of Arizona 1130N. Mountain Ave. Tucson, AZ 85721

  2. 2

    Schools of Aero/Astro, and Materials Engineering Purdue University 315 N. Grant St. West Lafayette, IN 47907

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 2005

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781574982374

Online ISBN: 9780470291276

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Keywords:

  • dynamic compressive;
  • split hopkinson pressure bar;
  • load bearing capacity;
  • armor system;
  • dynamic compressive

Summary

The dynamic compressive responses of a hot-pressed silicon carbide, SiC-N, have been determined at various damage levels. We employed a novel dynamic compressive experimental technique modified from a split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) to determine the dynamic properties of ceramics under loading conditions simulating those encountered in ceramic armors subjected to impact, in which a ceramic specimen was loaded by two consecutive stress pulses. The first pulse determines the dynamic response of the intact ceramic material and then crushes the specimen to a desired damage level. The second pulse then determines the dynamic compressive constitutive behavior of the damaged but still interlocked ceramic specimen. The first pulses were slightly varied to control the damage levels in the ceramic specimen while the second pulse was maintained identical. The results show that the compressive strengths of damaged ceramics depend on a critical level of damage, below which the specimen retains its load-bearing capacity.