20. Sphere Impact Induced Damage in Ceramics: I. Armor-Grade SiC and TiB2

  1. Jeffrey J. Swab
  1. J. C. LaSalvia,
  2. M. J. Normandia,
  3. H. T. Miller and
  4. D. E. Mackenzie

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470291276.ch20

Advances in Ceramic Armor: A Collection of Papers Presented at the 29th International Conference on Advanced Ceramics and Composites, January 23-28, 2005, Cocoa Beach, Florida, Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 26, Number 7

Advances in Ceramic Armor: A Collection of Papers Presented at the 29th International Conference on Advanced Ceramics and Composites, January 23-28, 2005, Cocoa Beach, Florida, Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 26, Number 7

How to Cite

LaSalvia, J. C., Normandia, M. J., Miller, H. T. and Mackenzie, D. E. (2008) Sphere Impact Induced Damage in Ceramics: I. Armor-Grade SiC and TiB2, in Advances in Ceramic Armor: A Collection of Papers Presented at the 29th International Conference on Advanced Ceramics and Composites, January 23-28, 2005, Cocoa Beach, Florida, Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 26, Number 7 (ed J. J. Swab), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470291276.ch20

Author Information

  1. U.S. Army Research Laboratory—Aberdeen Proving Ground AMSRD-ARL-WM-MD Aberdeen, MD 21005–5069

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 2005

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781574982374

Online ISBN: 9780470291276

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Keywords:

  • damage characterization;
  • armor grade;
  • metallography;
  • hertzian cone;
  • computational models

Summary

Armor-grade SiC and TiB2 cylinders (25.4 mm × 25.4 mm) were impacted with WC-6C0 spheres (6.35 mm diameter) at velocities between 50 m/s and 500 m/s. The recovered cylinders were subsequently sectioned and metallographically-prepared to reveal the dominant sub-surface damage types and change in damage severity as a function of impact velocity. In general, both ceramics exhibited radial, ring, Hertzian cone, and lateral cracks which increased in number and length as the impact velocity increased. Furthermore, both ceramics exhibited a comminuted region directly beneath the impact center which appeared to be wholly contained between the set of Hertzian cone cracks which formed first The comminuted region consisted of a high density of microcracks located at grain boundaries. The observed effect of impact velocity on the resulting damage and differences in damage between these two armor-grade ceramics will be presented.