8. Failure wave Propagation in Brittle Substances

  1. Jeffrey J. Swab
  1. M. A. Grinfeld,
  2. S. E. Schoenfeld and
  3. T. W. Wright

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470291276.ch8

Advances in Ceramic Armor: A Collection of Papers Presented at the 29th International Conference on Advanced Ceramics and Composites, January 23-28, 2005, Cocoa Beach, Florida, Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 26, Number 7

Advances in Ceramic Armor: A Collection of Papers Presented at the 29th International Conference on Advanced Ceramics and Composites, January 23-28, 2005, Cocoa Beach, Florida, Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 26, Number 7

How to Cite

Grinfeld, M. A., Schoenfeld, S. E. and Wright, T. W. (2005) Failure wave Propagation in Brittle Substances, in Advances in Ceramic Armor: A Collection of Papers Presented at the 29th International Conference on Advanced Ceramics and Composites, January 23-28, 2005, Cocoa Beach, Florida, Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 26, Number 7 (ed J. J. Swab), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470291276.ch8

Author Information

  1. US Army Research Laboratory Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD, 21005–5069

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 2005

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781574982374

Online ISBN: 9780470291276

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Keywords:

  • trans sonic velocities;
  • monograph;
  • geomechanics;
  • relevant phenomena;
  • standard shock-fronts

Summary

Extensive experiments with glasses and brittle ceramic materials have been made by different research groups in Britain, Russia, and the USA in the 1990s (1–4). The experiments showed that in addition to standard shock-wave fronts, which propagate with high, trans-sonic velocities, other, much slower, wavefronts can propagate within a substance undergoing processes of intensive damage. These moving fronts propagate into intact substance leaving behind them intensively damaged substance. The fronts have been called failure waves. The problem of failure waves demands significant progress in the relevant experiment, theory and numerical modeling, and these three pillars grow simultaneously and in close interaction with each other. Failure waves can be modeled in different ways(5–18)—in this paper we suggest modeling them as sharp interfaces separating two states: the intact and comminuted states. Here we mostly concentrate on the simplest models. However, they allow us to address several important problems. Our principal goal here is to derive a formula for the velocity of propagation of a failure wave, which is generated by oblique impact on the surface of a half-space.