18. Study of “Adsorption/Desorption” Phenomena on Friction Debris of Aircraft Brakes

  1. Manuel E. Brito,
  2. Peter Filip,
  3. Charles Lewinsohn,
  4. Ali Sayir,
  5. Mark Opeka and
  6. William M. Mullins
  1. Katarzyna Peszynska-Bialczyk1,
  2. Milan Krkoska1,
  3. Adam Pawliczek1,
  4. Peter Filip1 and
  5. Ken Anderson2

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470291283.ch18

Developments in Advanced Ceramics and Composites: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 26, Number 8

Developments in Advanced Ceramics and Composites: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 26, Number 8

How to Cite

Peszynska-Bialczyk, K., Krkoska, M., Pawliczek, A., Filip, P. and Anderson, K. (2005) Study of “Adsorption/Desorption” Phenomena on Friction Debris of Aircraft Brakes, in Developments in Advanced Ceramics and Composites: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 26, Number 8 (eds M. E. Brito, P. Filip, C. Lewinsohn, A. Sayir, M. Opeka and W. M. Mullins), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470291283.ch18

Author Information

  1. 1

    Center for Advanced Friction Studies, Southern Illinois University Carbondale 1230 Lincoln Drive, Engineering A 108 Carbondale, IL, 62901

  2. 2

    Department of Geology, Southern Illinois University Carbondale 1259 Lincoln Drive Carbondale, IL, 62901

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 2005

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781574982619

Online ISBN: 9780470291283

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Keywords:

  • phenomena;
  • physisorbed;
  • dynamometer;
  • thermal;
  • tribological

Summary

This paper discusses the influence of humidity and landing energy on the “adsorption/desorption” phenomena of friction debris obtained from carbon-carbon composite brake materials. Debris samples were collected from three discrete C/C materials during subscale dynamometer disc on disc type testing at various energy and humidity conditions (25 % and 100 % of normal landing energy (NLE); 2, 50 and 90 % relative humidity (RH)). Samples have been characterized using Temperature Programmed Reduction (TPR), Thermogravimetric Analysis coupled with Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (TGA/FTIR) and specific surface area (Brunauer-Emmet-Teller—BET) methods. The amount of physisorbed, chemisorbed and decomposed species strongly depends on the applied testing (brake dynamometer) conditions. Specific surface areas of debris obtained from different samples of materials are ranging from 800 to 1300 m2/g. TPR analysis indicates two reaction ranges, the first reaction range between 350 °C and 600 °C, and the second from 450 °C to 800 °C (maximum at 475 °C and 680 °C, respectively). CO2 and CO peaks detected using TGA/FTIR methods, occur as a result of decomposition of oxygen-containing functional groups that are formed by oxidation of the C/C during braking. The relative amount of these groups indicates the resistance of the brake materials to chemical reactivity.